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Paw Paw Pudding

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Paw paws are a small yellow fruit native to the Eastern United States, but has a very short harvest season of only a week. Because of this short harvest season, it is hard to find recipes for this delicious fruit so we have adapted a pumpkin pie recipe from Amelia Simons’ “American Cookery” cookbook.

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  • Pie Crust
  • 1 cup Paw Paw Flesh
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 1 Egg
  • 2-3 tbsp. Molasses
  • 1 tsp. Allspice
  • 1 tsp. ground Ginger

Make sure to remove all seeds from the paw paw flesh and mash it up. Whisk in milk and egg getting the mixture as smooth as possible. Mix in your molasses and spices. This mixture will be a little thin but will thicken up as it cooks.

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Pour the mixture into your pie crust and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely, probably even overnight before slicing.

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paw-paw-pudding-time-0_03_5103

Paw paws are a small yellow fruit native to the Eastern United States, but has a very short harvest season of only a week. Because of this short harvest season, it is hard to find recipes for this delicious fruit so we have adapted a pumpkin pie recipe from Amelia Simons’ “American Cookery” cookbook.

paw-paw-pudding-time-0_03_3118

  • Pie Crust
  • 1 cup Paw Paw Flesh
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 1 Egg
  • 2-3 tbsp. Molasses
  • 1 tsp. Allspice
  • 1 tsp. ground Ginger

Make sure to remove all seeds from the paw paw flesh and mash it up. Whisk in milk and egg getting the mixture as smooth as possible. Mix in your molasses and spices. This mixture will be a little thin but will thicken up as it cooks.

paw-paw-pudding-time-0_05_3701

Pour the mixture into your pie crust and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely, probably even overnight before slicing.

paw-paw-pudding-time-0_06_0301

Transcript of Video:

[Ivy] Hey dad, look what I found!

[Jon] Ah, let’s take a look! Wow, I’ll bet this is the leaf from the tree they came from?

[Ivy] What are they?

[Jon] These are paw paws. I’ve got an idea for these. Let’s take them to the kitchen.

[Jon] So paw paws are a strange exotic kind of fruit.

[Ivy] They look like a cross between a potato and an avocado.

[Jon] I mean, obviously, these really green ones, these aren’t done, but when they start to turn yellow, maybe with little brown spots like this, like a banana starts to get overripe, that’s when you know they’re getting ripe.

[Ivy] What do they look like on the inside?

[Jon] Well, on the inside, well, let’s cut this one open and we’ll find out. There we are, so look at that.

[Ivy] Wow, it’s yellow.

[Jon] Yeah, they’re very yellow on the inside and look at those seeds. Here you can pick one out.

[Ivy] They look kind of like beans.

[Jon] Definitely has an interesting fruity smell to it, like maybe some mango, that’s kind of what it looks like here, or apple flavor.

[Ivy] Mmm, that’s good.

[Jon] Is it like a sweet fruity flavor? Let’s see. Mmm, look at the texture though. It’s very soft and almost like a custard on the inside. A very soft and gentle flavor, but nice and sweet. You know they’re not very rare. They actually grow in most of the Eastern United States and all the way up into Eastern lower Canada, but the harvest season on these is very short. They’re really only ripe and ready to go for a couple of weeks, maybe only one week in the year and the forest animals can smell them and they’ll come and get them.

[Ivy] I can see why, they’re delicious.

[Jon] They do smell really good and you can tell how they could probably smell them from miles away. They also don’t travel well, so we’ll probably never find them in something like a grocery store. You might find them in a local farmer’s market or if you don’t find them there, you going to have to find them yourself in the woods.

[Ivy] Did people eat them in the 18th century?

[Jon] Actually they were eaten by the Native Americans and the settlers alike in the 18th century and you do find references to them, but you don’t really find them in any cookbooks, probably because they weren’t available all the time, so you never find a recipe until much later on in the 19th century. There’s also references to Louis and Clark feeding on these almost entirely at the very end of their journey’s in 1806. Louis and Clark were coming back and all their supplies were gone and so they had nothing but paw paws to survive on for a short period of time. So, let’s pretend we’re settlers and you’ve brought a whole bunch of paw paws to me, in fact you have brought a whole bunch of paw paws to me today and we can’t eat them all right away so what are we going to do with them?

[Ivy] I would find a recipe that I really liked that would preserve them.

[Jon] Right, but we don’t have any recipes that they had in the 18th century, so maybe we would…

[Ivy] I would adapt the recipe for something similar.

[Jon] And that’s exactly what they would have done in the 18th century. I’ve got a good idea for something that would probably cook up nicely. Hand me that little cookbook over there. So, this is Amelia Simons’ “American Cookery” cookbook. She did this one in 1796. It’s got a perfect recipe that I think will work with this. It’s called a pumpkin pudding. It’s really much what we would call a pumpkin pie, so we’ll adapt that recipe for these paw paws. Let’s get started.

[Jon] So, to get started, I’ve got a pie plate here with our pie crust in it and I’m going to set this aside and we’ll work on the filling. And the filling I’ve got here is about 1 cup of the paw paw flesh. We’ve got it taken out. I’m not sure if I got all the seeds, so I want you to mash that up and make sure we got all the seeds out.

[Jon] Good, that looks like we don’t have any seeds in there so go ahead and lift that out. I’m going to add in about 1 cup of milk. We’ll add that to it, and I’ve got 1 egg we’ll add to this. Pretty simple recipe. There’s our egg. And now we can whisk it. Now the trick with this is to get it ask smooth as we can. We don’t want it to be too lumpy. And this fruit can be a little stringy, you know, it changes its consistency, so we’re really going to have to get it mixed up well.

[Jon] Good, you’ve got that nice and smooth. We’ll add 2-3 tablespoons of this molasses and now we can add some spices. I’ve got a teaspoon of allspice and a teaspoon of ground ginger. We’ll add those in and keep mixing. Okay, it looks like you’ve got the consistency pretty well. There’s still a little lumpy but I don’t think it’s going to make any difference in this particular recipe.

[Ivy] It looks really runny.

[Jon] Well, you know, it is very, very thin, but I’ve made this recipe before and I thought at first, the first time I made it, that it was not going to work, but I baked it anyway, and it turned out perfect, so I’m going to trust that this will work out just fine, so let’s pour this into our pie plate, here we go.

[Jon] Okay, our pie plate is filled nicely. This looks good. It’s ready to go in the oven, so we’ll bake this at 350 degrees for maybe an hour and 20 minutes. I’ll put this in the oven.

[Jon] Before we slice this pie, we need to make sure that it’s cooled completely, probably even overnight.

[Ivy] I’m surprised how dark it is.

[Jon] You know, it is nice and dark. It looks very rich. Part of the color is going to be from the molasses and part of it’s just what’s happening with the paw paw. Let’s find out how it tastes.

[Jon] Well, boy, I’m really trying to find the flavor for this. It’s a wonderful flavor. It’s got a little bit of pumpkin pie in it but it’s much fruitier. It has an amazing little flavor to it. Boy, this is really good.

[Ivy] I can taste the allspice in it.

[Jon] Yeah, it’s wonderfully flavored. Thanks for bringing those paw paws in. They turned out to be tremendous in this dish and I want to thank you for coming along as we experiment. You never know what these things are going to turn out like, so as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century. And a special thanks to Jim Hoffman for his assistance in this episode.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Tiny Purses – Date Turnovers

Tiny Purses (Time 0_00_05;13)
This recipe is a date turnover from a 1596 cookbook called “The Good Housewife’s Jewel” called Tiny Purses.

  • 2 cups Dates stoned
  • 1 cup Raisins or Currants
  • 1 tbsp. Suet or Coconut Oil
  • 1 tsp. Ginger
  • 1 tsp. Cinnamon
  • 2 tsps. Sugar
  • Puff Paste
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Mix together your dates, raisins, suet, ginger, cinnamon, and sugar in a bowl. Cut puff paste into about 5 inch squares.

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Lay down your paste and place a flattened portion of the filling inside. Make sure it’s a decent size and flattened.

Tiny Purses (Time 0_01_45;15)Moisten two of the edges of the puff paste and fold it into a triangle then pinch the edges shut.

Tiny Purses (Time 0_01_53;01)
Bake at about 350 degrees until golden brown.

Transcription of Video:

Today we are going to make a recipe called tiny purses. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

This recipe comes from a 1596 cookbook called “The Good Housewife’s Jewel”. This recipe, although it’s called little purses, is really a date turnover. The first thing we have to do is stone these dates. I’ve got about 2 cupfuls of dates here.

Whoo, this is sticky! Although if you want to save time, you can buy your dates prestoned. Now that we stoned our dates, let’s mix our ingredients. First we need our dates, then we need a cupful of small raisins. I’m using zante currants. The recipe calls for marrow. I’m going to use a tablespoon of suet instead. A good substitute might be coconut oil. We’re also going to season it with a teaspoon of ginger, a teaspoon of cinnamon, and two teaspoons of sugar. Now that we’ve got all the ingredients, let’s mix it into the bowl.

Whoo, this is really sticky stuff! You’ve really got to dig into this!

Now that our mixture’s ready, let’s put them in the shells. The shells are going to be puff paste cut into about 5 inch squares. If you’re interested in making your own puff paste, I’ll put a link down below. Lay down your paste and put a flattened portion of the filling. Make sure it’s decent sized and flattened. Moisten two of the edges and fold it into a triangle. Make sure to pinch the edges.

These are ready to bake at about 350 degrees. I’m not sure how long these take but I’ll watch them till they’re golden brown.

These smell great. So good in fact, that I asked my dad to come and taste test with me.

[Jon] Well, they do smell great. I could smell them in the oven and wow, they filled the house up with a wonderful smell, so are we going to try them out? I think they’re cool enough, so let’s give them a try. You pick one. I’ll take this one. They look beautiful too. They could even have icing on them, but I think that would be too much. Mmm, that is a wonderful flavor and I really wasn’t expecting that. I ate a few of the dates that she had raw and the dates were actually, obviously, very good, but with the spices.

[Ivy] They taste wonderful.

[Jon] Right with that ginger and the cinnamon in there with the dates and the raisins or the currants, it’s got an amazing flavor that I really wasn’t expecting and a wonderful aroma.

[Ivy] Yes.

[Jon] You did an excellent job on these. They look kind of really hard to smoosh up.

[Ivy] They are.

[Jon] Yeah, it’s a very sticky, the dates and everything, getting that all together, but Ivy did a great job. Thank you for bringing us this recipe. It was wonderful. If you get a chance, this one, again, it’s simple, really not that many ingredients, and all these things you can find at the grocery store so you should be able to do these easily. So thank you so much Ivy and I want to thank you for coming along and savoring the flavors and the aromas

[together] of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Oxford Kate’s Sausage Recipe

Delicious Sausage (Time 0_02_39;28)Today Michael Dragoo is helping us with an Oxford Kate sausage recipe from Martha Washington’s cookbook. Martha Washington believes this should have been called Oxford Gate sausages after a tavern located near the north gate in Oxford but may have been misnamed.

  • 1lb Ham
  • 1lb Veal
  • ½lb Suet
  • 1 Egg Yolk
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Mace
  • Sage
  • Cloves
Delicious Sausage (Time 0_00_38;23)Simply mix the ingredients together well using the egg yolk as a binder. Add the spices in to taste.

Delicious Sausage (Time 0_01_08;01)
The recipe originally calls for an entire leg of ham and was 12 pounds of meat, so you can really make as much as you want. Once thoroughly mixed, roll the meat out into the thickness of a finger, about the size of a breakfast sausage. Melt some suet in a hot pan and gently fry the sausages until completely cooked.

Delicious Sausage (Time 0_00_08;12)

Optional Mustard Sauce Dip

  • Melted Butter
  • Mustard Seed
  • Vinegar
  • White wine
  • Sugar
  • Dash of Salt
Delicious Sausage (Time 0_02_49;14)
Mix to taste and use to dip sausage in.

Transcript of Video:

[Jon] Hi, I’m Jon Townsend and with me today is Michael Dragoo and we’re making

[Michael] Oxford Kates sausages.

[Jon] Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

[Jon] So Oxford Kates sausage? Explain that.

[Michael] Well, this is from the Martha Washington cookbook and Oxford Kate, she thinks, should have been Oxford Gate. Oxford, the town, had a surrounding walls and a gate and there was a tavern at the north gate.

[Jon] Okay

[Michael] Oxford Gate.

[Jon] So it’s famous for that.

[Michael] Oxford Gates sausage, yeah.

[Jon] Okay, so it looks pretty simple. What do we have here for ingredients?

[Michael] We are going to mince, she calls for ham or veal, I decided I could use ham and veal. I have a pound of veal. I have a pound of ham, and a half a pound of suet.

[Jon] If you’re looking for suet, it can be very difficult to find, on our website and in our print catalog, we have this wonderful suet that is available. It’s called tallow here but it’s what they would have called suet in the 18th century. It’s rendered kidney fat, not muscle fat.

[Michael] I’m going to be introducing the two meats and the suet together, mix that all up. I’m going to add 1 egg yolk as a binder, and then I’ve got salt, pepper, mace, sage, and cloves. I’m just going to mix that in. This recipe originally called for an entire leg of ham, of pig, and it was 12 pounds of meat put together, so we’ve really reduced these quantities, but they are to taste. Now that we’ve got this thoroughly mixed, the recipe is simple. It just says to roll these out the thickness of a finger, so these are going to be about the size of a breakfast sausage.

[Jon] And they smell good right there, just with the spices and everything.

[Michael] These are wonderful.

[Jon] They look great.

[Michael] It’s surprising how light these sausages wind up being.

[Jon] Right, you would think, oh, they’re going to be heavy, but the fat actually does something completely different than what you would expect, and these in different circumstances, you might just call these a forced meat sausages.

[Michael] Yep.

[Jon] Same thing.

[Michael] Yep. Forced meat is taking the meat and making it be something other than what it looks when it’s just a cut of meat.

[Jon] Okay, I’ve got the pan good and hot and I’ve got a good little bit of suet already in the pan. You could use butter to cook these in, but the suet’s not going to burn and smoke the same way butter would, so I recommend either a rendered butter, like a ghee, or the suet. I’m going to be very gentle with these so that they don’t fall apart, because they’re not like your modern breakfast sausage.

[Jon] Okay, the sausages are done and the recipe actually calls for these to have a little mustard sauce.

[Michael] It didn’t say what the mustard sauce consisted of, so simple mustard sauces are just butter and mustard seed. I’ve added vinegar and some white wine, sugar, a little salt. That’s what my sauce is.

[Jon] Well, it looks great. I guess, let’s give these a try.

[Michael] I’m ready.

[Jon] Are you?

[Michael] Yes.

[Jon] Mmm, look at that.

[Michael] I’m about to double dip. Ah man, those are excellent.

[Jon] You would compare these with a modern day breakfast sausage right? But they are not the same. These are much lighter of a texture, not nearly as firm.

[Michael] Not as dense.

[Jon] Right, and a mustard sauce, something I would not have expected. Not something I would have naturally put on something like this, but

[Michael] It’s like a heavy stone ground mustard. It’s got that kind of taste to it. These things, the suet just melts away, melts right out of it, so that you have these great little voids and it’s a light sausage.

[Jon] Its got some wonderful spicy flavors in there, the nice quantity of saltiness.

[Michael] I would have told you I hated cloves, but they really add something to this. It’s really low key.

[Jon] This one is great. It’s definitely easy, it’s simple. You should be able to do this in nothing flat and it makes a wonderful little sausage, so make sure to give this one a try. I want to thank you. I want to thank Michael for bring this, but I want to thank you for coming along with us as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

[Jon] If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Delicious Savory Onion Pie

Onion Pie (Time 0_00_08;15)

Today’s recipe is a wonderful savory onion pie from “The Little Primitive Cookery” cookbook. This cookbook is a compilation of 18th century recipes that this particular author put together for people of lesser means. This onion pie was probably a substitute for a meat pie, because it is a very savory pie. You’ll also find this recipe in Hanna Glass’s cookbook and some other 18th century English cookbooks as well, so it’s a really interesting, fun recipe.

  • Potatoes
  • Apples
  • Onions
  • Boiled Eggs
  • Salt
  • 1-2 tsps. ground Pepper
  • Mace
  • ½ tsp. Nutmeg
  • Short Crust
  • Butter
  • 2-3 tsps. Water

If you look at the original recipe, it says you’re going to end up using about a pound of potatoes, a pound of apples, a pound of onions, and a pound of eggs. That means the whole pie would weigh more than 4 pounds. That’s a huge pie, at least in the recipe. Our pie plate is much smaller, so we cut the recipe down quite a bit. In the end, you simply want to make sure you use about the same amount of potatoes, apples, onions, and boiled eggs so that you don’t have too much of one over the others. You want to fill your pie pan up to be sort of heaping but it will cook down a little bit.

To prepare your ingredients, you need to pare up the potatoes.

Onion Pie (Time 0_00_59;27)

You want to pare them up fairly thinly so that you have nice thin slices. Next, you’ll need maybe two or three apples, just like the potatoes.

Onion Pie (Time 0_01_13;26)

First pare and core them, then slice them nice and thin. Next up, onions, I mean this is an onion pie, right?

Onion Pie (Time 0_01_31;09)

Again, about the same quantity, so if your onions are a little bit smaller, you might need 3 or 4, and you’ll want to, of course, take the outer layer off and slice them up nice and thin. Again, probably about a 1/8th of an inch, maybe ¼ inch maximum. Our last main ingredient is the boiled eggs.

Onion Pie (Time 0_01_52;29)

It’s best to boil these the night before so they are cool. Let’s peel them up, and then slice them. If they’re fighting you, it’s alright. Even crumbled up, they’re going to work just fine, again, about the same amount.

Now let’s put together a quick spice mix that we’ll need as we’re assembling this.

Onion Pie (Time 0_02_12;25)

First we have some salt, maybe a teaspoon or two, ground pepper. We want some mace in this, and of course we need half a teaspoon of nutmeg. Now we’re ready to assemble this.

Onion Pie Time 0_02_20;14)

You’ll need to make sure to have a pie crust ready. If you are interested in our pie crust you can check out this episode we did back in the third season.

Assembling this pie is really simple.

Onion Pie (Time 0_03_01;21)

The recipe calls for just a couple little chunks of butter in the bottom and now let’s put a layer of potatoes in the very bottom of our pie. The recipe also calls for, as you’re putting these stages together, to put in a little bit of spices in each layer. Now we’re going to go with some apples and again with just a little bit of seasoning.

Onion Pie (Time 0_03_23;04)

Now we’re going to come in with some onion on top then some of the egg. Keep going with the layers until your pie is full.

We’re going to finish this pie up by placing some chunks of butter on top and 2 or 3 teaspoons of water.

Onion Pie (Time 0_03_58;14)

We’re sort of steaming the ingredients in this pie. Let’s put this top crust on pinch together the edges well so it’s connected to the bottom crust. Finally, put 3 little slices in the top so this vents a little bit.

Onion Pie (Time 0_04_26;13)

We don’t want it to bulge up with the steam pressure on the inside.

It’s ready to go in the oven. If you’re doing this in a standard oven in a modern kitchen, I would set the oven at about 350 degrees and this guy’s going to take at least 45 minutes, probably more like an hour to bake.

Onion Pie (Time 0_00_05;10)

This is a great full meal pie. It’s a wonderful main dish. This is such an inexpensive, quick, and easy pie to make up. It only takes an hour or so to bake and the flavors are amazing. You’ll love it, the kids will like it; even a little bit of mushroom ketchup on top of this will set it off perfectly.

Transcript of Video:

Today’s recipe is a wonderful savory onion pie. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking with Jas Townsend and Son.

So, today’s recipe comes from “The Little Primitive Cookery” cookbook. This cookbook is sort of a compilation of 18th century recipes that this particular 18th century author put together for people of lesser means and this onion pie is probably sort of a substitute for a meat pie. It’s a savory pie. You’ll find this recipe in Hanna Glass’s cookbook and in some other 18th century English cookbooks, so it’s a really interesting, fun recipe. Let’s get started.

This recipe is very simple. We need an equal quantity of potatoes, apples, onions and boiled eggs sliced up, so let’s get started. I’m going to pare up some potatoes here. You want to pare them up fairly thinly so that you have nice thin slices and then we can move on to some apples. You’ll need, again, maybe two or three apples, just like the potatoes. First we’re going to pare them and then core them, and now slice them nice and thin. Next up, onions, I mean this is an onion pie right? Again, about the same quantity, so if your onions are a little bit smaller, you might need 3 or 4, and you’ll want to, of course, take the outer layer off of these and slice them up nice and thin. Again, probably about an 1/8th of an inch, maybe ¼ inch max. And our last main ingredient here, the boiled eggs. I boiled these up last night. Let’s peel them up, and now I’m going to kind of slice them. They’re fighting me, but even crumbled up, they’re going to work just fine, again, about the same amount.

Now let’s put together a quick spice mix that we’ll need as we’re assembling this. First we have some salt, maybe a teaspoon or two, ground pepper. We want some mace in this, so I’ve got some mace here, and of course we need in every recipe, nutmeg, half a teaspoon of nutmeg total, and now I’m just going to stir these up. Now we’re ready to assemble this. We have all the ingredients set up and I’ve already got a short crust put into this red ware pie pan. You’ll need to make sure to have a pie crust ready. If you are interested in this pie crust you can go and check out the episode we did, I think back in the third season. I’ll put a link down in the description section.

Let’s assemble this pie. It’s really simple. First we’re going to start off with a little bit of butter in the bottom. The recipe calls for just a couple little chunks here in the bottom and now let’s put a layer of potatoes in the very bottom of our pie. The recipe also calls for, as you’re putting these stages together, to put in a little bit of spices in each layer. Now we’re going to go with some apple here, again with just a little bit of seasoning. That’s good, now we’re going to come in with some onion on top here and now let’s put in some of the egg. Now the instructions say to keep going with the layers. Now depending on how thick your pie is, you may not have enough room for another layer but I’m going to do a thin layer.

Now if you look at this recipe here, toward the end it says you’re going to end up using about a pound of potatoes, a pound of apples, a pound of onions, and a pound of eggs. That means this whole pie is going to weigh more than 4 pounds. It’s a huge pie, at least in the recipe. This pie in this pie plate is much smaller, so you won’t need a full pound. Obviously this is going to fill this pie right up though. It’s going to be sort of heaping, but that’s okay, it’s going to cook down a little bit.

We’re going to finish this pie up now by placing some chunks of butter up on top and a little bit of water too. Maybe 2 or 3 teaspoons, it calls for adding a little bit of water in here, we’re sort of steaming the ingredients in this pie, and let’s put this top crust on and let’s pinch this together and get this connected so it’s connected to the bottom crust. Now that we finished that up, we can just put 3 little slices in the top so this vents a little bit. We don’t want it to sort of bulge up with the steam pressure on the inside.

And here’s our assembled pie. It’s ready to go in the oven. If you’re doing this in a standard oven in a modern kitchen, I would set the oven at about 350 degrees and this guy’s going to take at least 45 minutes, probably more like an hour to bake.

Wow, this pie smells great. Let’s cut into it and see what it looks like.

Mmm, wow.

That is really, really good. It’s got a wonderful mix of flavors and spices and it’s so wonderful and savory and moist still. I mean with all that butter in there, you know it’s good. This is a great kind of full meal pie, you wouldn’t need to have a meat course if you had a pie like this that you were serving with maybe with just one little side dish or something. It’s a wonderful main dish. If you get a chance at all, and this is such an inexpensive quick and easy pie to make up, it only takes an hour or so to bake and the flavors are amazing, so definitely give this one a try. You’ll love it, the kids will like it, even a little bit of mushroom ketchup on top of this will set it off perfectly.

I want to thank you so much for joining me today as we come along and savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

The Best Bread Pudding Yet

Best Bread Pudding (Time 0_00_13;19)
The Best Bread Pudding yet from The Primitive Cookery Cookbook 1767 is a very simple bread pudding to make.

Bread Pudding

  • ¾ cup Flour
  • 1 cup Bread Crumbs
  • 4 oz. Raisins or Currants
  • 2 tbsps. Sugar
  • ½ tsp. ground Ginger
  • 2 whole Eggs
  • 2 Egg Yolks
  • 1 cup Heavy Cream

Pudding Sauce

  • 1/3 Butter
  • 1/3 Sugar
  • 1/3 Brandy

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Best Bread Pudding (Time 0_01_19;14)

Combine flour, bread crumbs, raisins, sugar and ginger in one bowl. In another bowl beat together the eggs, yolks, and heavy cream. Combine all the ingredients for a nice thick batter. Turn out into a well buttered dish. Bake for about 45 minutes at 350 degrees.

For sauce, melt butter and combine with sugar and brandy.

Best Bread Pudding (Time 0_02_07;12)

Allow pudding to cool then turn out onto plate, slice and cover with sauce.

Transcript of Video:

Hi, I’m Jon Townsend. We’re continuing our series in Dutch oven cooking. Today we’re going to be using the skills that we’ve learned earlier to bake a pudding, a bread pudding, in one of these Dutch ovens. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

This recipe is rather simple. It’s from the Primitive Cookery cookbook 1767. That cookbook is available on our website and in our print catalog. Let’s get these simple ingredients together. Our ingredients are rather simple. We’ve got ¾ of a cup of flour along with 1 cup of bread crumbs. Also 4 ounces of raisins or currants. I’ve got 2 tablespoons of sugar and just a half a teaspoon or so of ground ginger. For the wet ingredients, I’ve got 2 whole eggs and 2 egg yolks and one cup of heavy cream.

Now that we’ve got the wet ingredients all beat up, let’s pour them in, mix the two together. We’re looking for a nice thick batter.

I’m going to turn this out into a well buttered dish.

This is ready to go. Let’s put it in the oven. It’s a beautiful day out and there’s very little wind so we found by previous experience with a 12 inch Dutch oven like this, we’ll need about 2 scoops of coals beneath and 3 scoops on top. We want this to bake for about 45 minutes at 350 degrees. If you haven’t watched our previous episode where we talked about getting these ovens up to heat, make sure to go back and check those out. I’ll make sure to put a link down in the description section of this video. This is feeling like it’s really preheated and ready to go.

I’ve let this cool and we’re going to turn it out onto a plate and now slice it and oh yes we need finally, the thing that really sets all these puddings off is a pudding sauce. Do not forget the pudding sauce. This particular sauce is 1/3 butter, 1/3 sugar and 1/3 brandy, so let’s give this a try.

Mmm, superb flavors, and that sauce, I could eat that sauce all day, it is wonderful. A great little pudding, very easy to bake in one of these Dutch ovens. Extremely easy to mix up and very simple ingredients. This is superb. So we’re experimenting. We’re trying out different things and I really want to thank you for coming along as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

White Pot Bread Pudding

White Pot (Time 0_01_02;03)

White pot is a sweet, buttery, bready, custard type bread pudding originating from 18th century Devon in southwest England. The term white pot simply means white pudding. Recipes for white pot changed very little over the years and between regions. They primarily consist of bread, sometimes rice, sugar, eggs, usually cream, some spice, and sometimes a little bit of fruit.

  • 1 pint Cream
  • 1 Cinnamon Stick
  • Pinch of Salt
  • Mace
  • Fresh Nutmeg
  • 2 whole Eggs plus 1 Egg Yolk
  • 4-5 tbsps. Sugar
  • Loaf of White Bread
  • ½ cup butter
  • Plenty of Raisins and Dates
  • Fresh Cream or Sac (optional)

The first thing we need to do is preheat our oven. If you’re going to use a Dutch oven you need to get an ember bed ready for that. If you’re using a wood fired oven, that needs to be fired up, but you’ll need to let it cool down a little bit to get to the right temperature. If you’re using a regular home oven, you need to preheat it to 350 degrees.

White Pot (Time 0_02_06;22)

We’re using our everted saucepan today, but you could use a pipkin, a boiler. or whatever you have available. Begin by placing a pint of cream in the saucepan, followed by a stick of cinnamon, a pinch of salt, a little bit of mace, and some fresh ground nutmeg. As soon as this begins to simmer, you’re going to need to remove it from the heat to let it cool.

Now let’s take care of our eggs. We need two whole eggs one egg yolk, along with 2-3 tablespoons of sugar, and whisk this all together.

Next we are going to take some nice white bread slice it very, very thin as well as removing the crust so you’re left with nothing but the crumb. You’ll need enough crumb to fill your baking pan or tin. In this case we are using one of our tin eating bowls, but you could also use something bigger, like one of our milk pans, but you would then need about twice the amount of ingredients and to increase the baking time.

White Pot (Time 0_03_24;15)

Butter each of these slices liberally on one side. You will end up using about a half a cup of butter or one full stick. While the butter is out, go ahead and butter your pan or tin as well. Make sure that this is buttered liberally as well or the sugar in the white pot will make it very difficult to release later.

White Pot (Time 0_03_31;19)

Once the cream has cooled a bit, you can remove the cinnamon stick, then add just a little bit of the warm cream mixture into the eggs while whisking it just a little, to temper the eggs, so the eggs don’t curdle. Once we’ve got a little bit completely whisked in, we can start adding the rest of the cream little by little.

Now we can start layering our pudding. We’re going to start by putting in a layer of bread on the bottom of our bowl butter side down to completely cover up the bottom of the bowl. Next, let’s put a layer of raisins and dates in on top of that. Then another layer of the bread, butter side down, making sure that there are no air gaps. If you need to tear your bread up a little bit to fill in the gaps do that. The next layer is the raisins and dates again.

Copy of White Pot Collage

Once we have our second layer in the pan, we can start to add some of the custard mixture. Pour in just enough that it soaks into the two bottom layers but doesn’t come up above the top of the bread. Once that is done, continue layering your pudding until the dish is filled up. Finally, pour in the rest of the custard mixture until it fills up the rest of the tin and soaks completely into the bread. Place the final pieces of bread butter side up to fill up the top and tamp them down a little so they soak up the custard from underneath. Sprinkle about 1-2 tablespoons of sugar on top and it’s ready to bake.

Check on your choice of oven to make sure that it has preheated to the correct temperature. If you are using a Dutch oven, set up a ring of coals to set it on and place a trivet inside to set the white pot on. Once the lid is added, place coals around the top of the lid as well. You will need to keep watching the Dutch oven to make sure the coals stay hot enough and renew the coals on the top and bottom as they cool. This will take about 35 minutes but it is a good idea to watch as it will burn quickly.

White Pot (Time 0_08_24;04)

Allow to cool for a few minutes and then turn out onto a plate. For added enjoyment, you can sprinkle some sugar on top and brown it using a heated salamander, kitchen torch, or broiler, just be careful not to burn it. A nice finishing touch would be some fresh cream poured on top. Sac, which is what we call sweet cherry, was also very common in 18th century recipes.

Transcript of Video:

Foods of the 18th century were often very regional. Take for instance, this little dish, its sweet, it’s buttery, it’s custardy, and it’s bready. It’s a bready little dessert. It’s also got raisins and dates in it. In many places, this might be called a bread pudding, but this regional variation is famously known as white pot.

We found a number of white pot recipes, some as early as the 16th century and others right on into the 18th century. The term white pot is a provincial phrase originating from southwest England, specifically the Devon area and it simply means white pudding.

Recipes for white pot change very little over the years. They primarily consist of bread, sometimes rice, sugar, eggs, usually cream, some spice, and sometimes a little bit of fruit. Let’s get started. The first thing we need to do is preheat our oven. We’re going to be using the Dutch oven today. If you’re going to use a Dutch oven you need to get an ember bed ready for that. If you’re using a wood fired oven, that needs to be fired up, but you’ll need to let it cool down a little bit to get to the right temperature, and if you’re using a regular home oven, you need to preheat it to 350 degrees.

We’re using our everted saucepan today. You could use a pipkin or a boiler or whatever you have available. We’re going to begin by placing a pint of cream in our saucepan. Now let’s place a stick of cinnamon in that, a pinch of salt here, a little bit of mace, and now let’s grind some fresh nutmeg.

As soon as this begins to simmer, you’re going to need to remove it from the heat and let it cool down. Now let’s take care of our eggs. We need two whole eggs in this and we need one egg yolk, and now we need two to three tablespoons of sugar. Now all we have to do is whisk this together.

Now that our cream is simmering, let’s go ahead and take it off and let it cool down. I’m going to take some nice white bread now and I’m going to slice it very, very thin and then take off the crust so I’m left with nothing but the crumb. We’ll need enough crumb to fill up our baking. In this case I’m using one of our tin eating bowls. You could also, if you wanted a larger one, use one of these milk pans, but you definitely need about twice the amount of ingredients and you need to increase the baking time.

Each one of these slices, I’m going to butter quite liberally on one side. I’m going to end up using about a half a cup of butter, one stick. While we’ve got our butter out, it’s time to butter our pan. The bowl needs to be buttered liberally or the sugar that’s in our white pot will make it very difficult to release.

And now our cream has cooled a bit, we can take out the cinnamon stick and now we’re going to add just a little bit of the warm cream mixture into the eggs while we whisk it just a little bit first to temper the eggs so that the eggs don’t curdle. Once we’ve got a little bit in, we’ve got that totally whisked in; we can start adding the rest little by little.

Now let’s get started with our layering. We’re going to start by putting in bread on the bottom of our bowl. We want to put the butter side down. We’re going to put in two pieces here and we’ll cover up the bottom of the bowl and now let’s put a layer of raisins and dates in on top of that. That’s good. We’re going to do another layer, butter side down of the bread. So we want to make sure that there are no air gaps so if you need to tear your bread up a little bit to fill in the gaps do that. Our raisins and dates again. Once we’ve got our second layer here, we can start to add some of our custard mixture. We’re going to just pour in enough that it soaks into these two bottom layers but doesn’t come up above the top of that bread.

So that looks pretty good. Let’s just do another layer.

Our dish is filled up. Let’s put our custard mixture in until it fills it right up and soaks in. That looks good. I think we’ll be able to use just about all of it. That looks good. Now we’re going to take our final pieces of buttered bread and we’re just going to fill up the top. We’re going to put this in butter side up instead of butter side down and fill that top.

Oh yeah, there we go. We’re going to tamp that down just a little bit so that it soaks up from the bottom and now we’re going to add some sugar to the top of it. We probably got another tablespoon here or so. Now that’s ready to bake.

Now it’s time to bake this guy. We’re going to be using this Dutch oven. I’ve got it already preheated some, and we’re going to set it on a ring of coals that we’ve got already set up here. Now let’s place our trivet inside and then we can add our pudding, our white pot in, right up on top, and we can set our lid on. I’m going to put some coals up on top. Again, usually we just need a ring of coals that go around the outside edge here.

Okay, we’ve got our ring of coals up on top so I’m going to keep watching this and at times I’ll have to renew the coals up on top and maybe even tuck a few more in the bottom.

While white pots originated from the Devon area, they were certainly well known to colonial cooks as well. While they might not have kept the same name, they kept the same construction. Bread puddings are becoming popular again today and some chefs have even discovered this interesting variation.

It’s starting to smell really good and it’s only been about 35 minutes. Let’s take a quick look at this. As you can see this is already well on its way, so we’re going to take this out. This is done.

We’re going to let this cool and then turn it out onto a plate.

If you happen to have a salamander, you can heat it up very hot, then sprinkle some sugar on top of your white pot and brown it. You can also do that with a kitchen torch or with a broiler. Just be careful not to burn your white pot.

A nice finishing touch would be some fresh cream poured on top or maybe a little sac which is what we call sweet cherry, was very common in 18th century recipes.

Wow, that is excellent. Its buttery, the sweetness of the sweetmeats and the custard really sets it off. It’s delicious. You’re going to love this.

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Fried Chicken

Fried Chicken (Time 0_05_46;03)

We usually think of fried chicken traditionally as an American dish, but today I’m going to share with you an old English recipe from a little recipe book by Nathan Bailey called “Dictionarium Domesticum” written in 1736 that I think will change the way you make fried chicken. It’s set up like a dictionary so it’s in alphabetical order and you’ll find this recipe under marinade.

Fried Chicken

  • Whole Chicken Quartered
  • Oil for frying
  • Parsley Sprigs

Marinade

  • 2 Large Lemons
  • Equal amount Distilled Vinegar
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • 1 tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Black Pepper
  • ¼ tsp. Cloves
  • ½ cup Green Onions or Shallots

Batter

  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose Flour
  • White Wine like Rhine Wine
  • 3 Egg Yolks
  • 1 tsp. Salt

Fried Chicken (Time 0_02_52;09)

Now this recipe is actually pretty simple. It starts off with a very basic marinade of lemon juice and verjuice or vinegar. Verjuice is actually a very common ingredient you’ll find in early 18th century recipes. It comes from the juice of unripe unfermented grapes, and while it’s very sour, actually has a very mild flavor. If you’re going to use vinegar, what would have been typical in an 18th century English setting would be malt vinegar, but the time period, it was called wine vinegar. If you can’t find malt vinegar or you are looking for a milder flavor you can use cider vinegar or even distilled vinegar.

We are going to use the juice of two large lemons and an equal amount of distilled vinegar. To that, I am going to add two bay leaves, a teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon of black pepper, and a quarter of a teaspoon of cloves. The last ingredient is something called chaebols and we had to look that one up. We found out that it is a spring onion or as we would call it, green onions and we are going to use a half a cup. You could substitute this with shallots as they were also very common in the 18th century and it would probably make a very interesting flavor addition.

The recipe calls for quartering your chicken. I’ve actually cut it up into individual pieces so that it’ll go a little farther. The recipe suggests marinating this chicken for 3 hours and you should probably stick to that. Some of the more powerful ingredients, like the malt vinegar, can really enhance the flavor too much if you marinate for too long.

Fried Chicken (Time 0_04_45;17)

Once you come to the 3-hour mark, it’s time to work on the batter portion. Like our marinade, the batter is also very easy to make. I’m using about a cup and a half of flour, just regular all-purpose flour will work fine. Add enough white wine, like Rhine wine would be good, to make this into a thin pancake batter. If you don’t want to use wine, you could use cider instead or maybe just water. Finally, add the yolks of 3 eggs and a teaspoon of salt. You can top this off with a little more wine if needed to get the right batter consistency.

There was no suggestion of the particular kind of oil to fry in. In the 18th century, they would most likely have used lard or even a clarified butter. You can use the modern oil of your choice. Be very careful If you are deep frying over an open fire. You want to heat your oil to about 350 degrees. You should see a little shimmer on the top, but definitely not smoking.

We’re going to fry this in batches of 3 or 4, maybe 5 pieces, depending on the size of your pot. I’m not sure exactly how long you want to cook it, but you want to get to the point where the color is a nice light mahogany brown.

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Now before we serve this, there’s just one more component that we need to do, fried parsley. Now you may think that’s strange, but trust me, you’ll love it. Before you fry your parsley, make sure it is very, very dry. Blot it as much as possible, or the results can be disastrous. Fry it in small batches for several minutes until it gets nice and crispy. We’ll crumble this over the chicken as a tasty garnish.

Fried Chicken (Time 0_06_00;03)

18th century fried chicken flavors are definitely a little different than what you’re used to. That marinade does something really special. You get a little bit of that lemon flavor coming through just a little bit with a hint of that wonderful flavor and the crispiness and the fried parsley is really interesting. I really love this recipe. If you give this one a try, I really hope you go down in the comments section and tell us how it works out. I love this one and I think everyone should try it.

Transcript of Video:

We usually think of fried chicken as well, traditionally an American dish, but today I’m going to share with you an old English recipe from 1736 that I think will change the way you make fried chicken. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

The recipe today comes from the little recipe book by Nathan Bailey called “Dictionarium Domesticum” from 1736 and it’s an odd little cookbook. It’s set up like a dictionary so it’s in alphabetical order and this recipe you’ll find under marinade. So that’s where we need to start with this recipe, with the marinade. Now this one’s actually pretty simple. It starts off with the liquid portion which is lemon juice and verjuice or vinegar. Verjuice is actually a very common ingredient you’ll find in early 18th century recipes. It comes from the juice of unripe grapes, unfermented, and while it’s very sour, it actually has a very mild flavor. If you’re going to use vinegar, the vinegar that would have been typical in an 18th century, especially English, setting would be malt vinegar. In the time period, they called it wine vinegar, but it’s actually malt vinegar today. If you can’t find that or you want to use something that doesn’t quite have that kind of a flavor, then you can use cider vinegar or even distilled vinegar. Lemons were available as well, depending on your location and your social position and interestingly enough, lemon zest or lemon peel was the second most common type of spice you’ll find in many of the 18th century cookbooks, so very common. In this case I’m opting for the juice of two large lemons and an equal amount of distilled vinegar. The recipe suggests salt, pepper, cloves and bay leaf, but no real amounts here, except for the number of bay leaves, two bay leaves, so we’re guessing maybe a teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon of black pepper, and a quarter of a teaspoon of cloves, and the last ingredient is something called chaebols and we had to look that one up. That’s a spring onions or as we would call it, green onions. I’ve got about a half a cup. Shallots are something that you could substitute in in this place as shallots were very common in the 18th century and it would probably make a very interesting flavor addition.

The recipe calls for quartering your chicken. I’ve actually cut it up into individual pieces so that it’ll go a little farther. The recipe suggests marinating this chicken for 3 hours and you should probably stick to that. If you used some of the more powerful, like the malt vinegar, it can really enhance the flavor too much so 3 hours is a good time.

We’re coming up on our 3 hour mark and it’s time to work on the batter portion and this is a little bit different than what I’m used to. Like our marinade, the batter is also very easy to make. I’m using about a cup and a half of flour, just regular all-purpose flour will work fine and enough white wine, like a Rhine wine, would be good, adding enough to make this into a thin pancake batter, and finally I’m going to add the yolks of 3 eggs. You can top this off with a little more wine if you need to to get to the right batter consistency, and finally a teaspoon of salt will finish this off and mix it so that it’s nice and even. If you don’t want to use wine, you could use cider instead or maybe just water. There was no suggestion of the particular kind of oil to fry it in. In the 18th century, they would have used lard probably or even a clarified butter. You can use the modern oil of your choice. We are deep frying with oil right over an open fire. Obviously you have to be very careful when you’re doing it like this. You want to heat your oil to about 350 degrees. You should see a little shimmer in the top, definitely not smoking.

We’re going to fry this in batches of 3 or 4 pieces, maybe 5 pieces. Really it depends on the size of your pot, and I’m not sure exactly how long you want to cook it, but you want to get to the point where the color is a nice light mahogany brown.

Now before we serve this, there’s just one more component that we need to do, fried parsley. Now you may think that’s strange, but trust me, you’ll love it. Before you fry this parsley, make sure it is very, very dry. Completely dry, blot it as much as possible, or the results can be disastrous. Fry it in small batches for several minutes until it gets nice and crispy. We’ll crumble this over the chicken as a tasty garnish.

Well, there it is. It looks wonderful, let’s find out just how it tastes.

Wow, 18th century fried chicken, and the flavors are definitely a little different than what you’re used to. That marinade does something really special. You get a little bit of that lemon flavor comes through just a little bit, a hint of that wonderful flavor and the crispiness, the fried parsley is really interesting. Mmm, I really love this recipe. This one is great! Who would have thought 18th century fried chicken? It’s great. If you give this one a try, I really hope you go down in the comments section and tell us how it works out. I love this one and I think everyone should try it. I want to thank you for coming along as we experiment. We try these really interesting things out, this food from history. I want to thank you for joining me as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here, also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Quaking Pudding

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Quaking pudding is much more like the modern day pudding idea that we have in our heads. . It is definitely different than the plum pudding. The ratios are much different, a lot less flour and a lot more liquid parts.

  • ½ cup Flour
  • 2 tbsps. Sugar
  • ½ tsp. Salt
  • 1 tsp. Mace
  • 1 tsp. Ground Ginger
  • ¼ – ½ of a Nutmeg grated
  • 1 cup Slivered Almonds split
  • 1 cup Heavy Cream
  • 2 Whole Eggs
  • 2 Egg Yolks
  • Butter

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First, go ahead and get your pot of water boiling; however for this pudding you will not be putting your cloth into the water. We will take care of the cloth later once the pudding is ready for it.

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So, let’s put together this pudding. We’re going to put together our dry ingredients first and then our wet ingredients. The measurements don’t have to be precise for this recipe to work. Add together about a half a cup of flour, about 2 tablespoons of sugar, a half a teaspoon of salt, a teaspoon full of mace, the same amount of ground ginger, a quarter to a half of a nutmeg grated up, and for our last dry ingredient some slivered almonds. Before adding the almonds, take about a ½ cup of them and mash them up really good, then add those into the dry ingredients. We will use the rest of the almonds later. Mix up the dry ingredients well.

Now we need a cup of heavy cream and four eggs. We actually want two whole eggs and just the yolks of the other two and then we’re going to whisk these together, so there are eggs in our cream. You want to get these whisked really well.

Now that we’ve got these all mixed, put our wet and dry ingredients together.

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Once these are well mixed, we can now get our pudding cloth ready. So, for this pudding, we didn’t want to put the cloth in the boiling water. We need to seal the cloth a little tighter for this pudding so we are going to butter it first and then flour it. Rub the butter into the cloth well so the pudding doesn’t just strain out of the cloth. Once it’s buttered, we can just put our flour on just like before, then place it in a bowl and pour the pudding mix in.

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When you tie the ends for this pudding, you want to make sure to give it a bit of room to grow. When your water is boiling, carefully place your pudding into the pot. It will take about a half hour to cook.

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While the quaking pudding is cooking, we’re going to make a quick sauce with some butter and sugar. In a small saucepan or pipkin, on gentle heat, mix together equal parts butter and sugar until fully melted.

Quaking Pudding (Time 0_09_16;27)

When removing your quaking pudding, you have to be gentler with it. Use the remaining slivered almonds to dress up the top and the pour the sauce on before serving. This is a very delectable dish. It is more custardy than the other puddings that we have been making. With all that butter and sugar on top and the almonds, it looks beautiful and it tastes good. You’ve got no excuse. You really must try one of these wonderful boiled puddings.

 

Transcript of Video:

So in last week’s episode, we covered a simple boiled plum pudding, which consisted of equal parts flour, milk, eggs, butter, and the plums or raisins in that case, but I thought we would look at the boiled puddings and explore this idea a little bit farther. I think there’s a lot more to learn.

So here’s a little piece that I ran into while I was doing research. It’s from a 1780 gentleman’s monthly intelligence. It was a section on diet. It says, “There is at this time residing in Essex a person famed for his mode of living. Being formally reduced to a state of general weakness from free and luxurious living, he took up a resolution of dieting himself thus, he has a pound of flour and a pint of cold water mixed and then tied up in a cloth and boiled and on this food he’s lived entirely for many years. Though he is old, he is hardy, strong, vigorous and active.”

I thought that was very interesting, somebody living on nothing but flour, a flour pudding, boiled, and then I was thinking about soldiers living on nothing but their meat and a simple flour ration.

Also, many period recipes cover putting apples inside of a pudding and boiling that. Those two ideas, I thought we’d put together and make a simple soldier style pudding. Nothing but flour, an apple off of a tree and wrapped in a little bit of scrap cloth. Just what a soldier might be able to make.

So let’s make up a very simple, nothing but flour and water  paste. We’re just going to take about two handfuls of flour and we’re going to add in some nice cool water and then mix that up. We kind of want it to be not very stiff kind of a paste here. Okay, so not too stiff. We want to be able to form it around it without it fighting.

Once that’s ready, we need to take our apple and I’ve already quartered this. We’re going to take out the seeds and the stem.

Let’s take our quartered apple and put it back together into an apple shape and then take our paste, which has thickened up a little bit as I was working on it, and we’re just going to wrap it around that apple so it’s all about a quarter of an inch thick. It grows as it cooks so it doesn’t need to be terribly thick.

And there we can see, now we can put this inside of our floured cloth.

There we are.

And let’s flour this up.

And now it’s time to wrap it up in the cloth. We’re just going to set it in the center and gather it up, and you definitely want to give it a little bit of room so that it can grow while it’s cooking. Not too tight. Let’s go toss it in.

Let’s make sure our water is boiling and it should take about an hour for this apple pudding. While this is cooking, we’re going to cover a quaking pudding. Those don’t take very long to cook either.

So, quaking pudding is much more like that modern day pudding idea that we have in our heads. Let’s take a look at the ingredients.

So, let’s put together this pudding. We’re going to put together our dry ingredients first and then our wet ingredients. We’re going to need about a half a cup of flour. Now we don’t have to be precise. This is definitely different than the plum pudding. The ratios are much different, a lot less flour and a lot more liquid parts. About a half a cup of flour, now let’s put in, we need about 2 tablespoons of sugar, we’ve got this pretty much all ground up.

There we are.

We need some salt, maybe a half a teaspoon of salt. We’re definitely going to need some of those same kind of spices. We’ve got some mace here, a teaspoon full. We’ve got some ground ginger, same amount. So, you’ll need a quarter to a half of a nutmeg grated up. For our last dry ingredient I have some almonds here. I’ve got maybe a half a cup of slivered almonds here. We’re going to mash these up.

Once these are good and mashed up, we can add these to our dry ingredients, the rest of them here. There we are.

Now we need a cup of heavy cream and four eggs. We actually want two whole eggs and just the yolks of the other two and then we’re going to whisk these together, so there are eggs in our cream. You want to get these whisked really well.

Now that we’ve got these all mixed, put our wet and dry ingredients together.

There we are.

Once these are well mixed, we need to get our pudding cloth ready. Okay, now we’ve got our cloth but instead of putting it in the boiling water and then flouring it, this one we want to seal a little tighter, so we’re going to butter it first and then flour it. Get it to seal all the way into our fabric there. Now once it’s buttered, we can just put our flour on just like before.

Now we can take our buttered and floured cloth and put it in the bowl and pour our pudding mix in.

There we are, and tie it up.

This is another pudding that you want to give a little bit of room to grow. And there we go, and it’s ready to go in. Let’s make sure that water’s boiling.

Okay, this quaking pudding should take about a half hour to cook.

Now that that quaking pudding is cooking, we’re going to make a quick sauce with some butter and some sugar.

When you use these pipkins, you want to make sure that you don’t put them on direct heat with flames. You want to use them only on coals. You want to make sure that you always have something in them or else they get too hot and they’ll crack and use them gently with gentle heat.

It’s been about a half hour for the quaking pudding and about an hour for the apple one, so both of those should be ready to come out.

Let’s cut open this apple pudding or apple dumpling.

And there is our pudding. Let’s slice it and see how it turned out.

Look at that.

You’d be amazed with nothing but a little bit of flour and one apple what you can turn out. It is really good.

So I haven’t found much about soldiers doing boiled puddings yet, but there is a piece in Joseph Plum Martin’s book about soldiers coming and stealing a woman’s food, including her pudding, bag and all.

Now for our quaking pudding. This one’s a little bit more, you have to be more gentle with it. Now let’s dress this up with a few slivered almonds and then put sauce on top.

Wow, that’s delectable. You’ll love this wonderful quaking pudding. A lot more custardy than the other one. It’s not nearly as bready and that butter and sugar on top with the almonds, it looks beautiful and it tastes good.

You’ve got no excuse. You really must try one of these wonderful boiled puddings. Hey, all the things you’ve seen here today, all the cooking equipment, all the clothing, all these things are available on our website, they’re available in our print catalog and don’t forget to follow us on Facebook.

Mushroom Ketchup

Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_05_50;07)
The first recipe for tomato ketchup was in 1801, but tomato ketchup did not become popular until the mid-19th century. The tomato plant is a member of the deadly nightshade family and many people considered it a deadly poison in the 18th century. Today we’re going to make an 18th century ketchup recipe with mushrooms. This would be a seasoning or a flavor that 18th century soldiers would be very familiar with.

  • 2 Pounds Fresh Common Brown Mushrooms
  • Couple spoonfuls of Salt
  • Couple of Bay leaves
  • 1 Chopped Onion
  • Zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 Tablespoon finely grated Horse Radish
  • ¼ teaspoon Cloves
  • Pinch of Cayenne
  • ½ teaspoon Allspice
  • ¼-½ cup Cider Vinegar

 

Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_00_57;27)
We’re starting off with 2 pounds of fresh mushrooms, but first a word of warning. We’re using common brown mushrooms in our recipe today. Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_01_18;26)
These mushrooms are native throughout Europe and North America, but even common mushrooms can easily be mistaken for poisonous or even deadly varieties, so make sure to use something you know is completely safe.

Mushroom KetchupTime 0_01_46;16)
We need to gently wipe these mushrooms off. We don’t want to rinse them off or wash them, because that added liquid would dilute our final flavors. Chop them into small pieces.

Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_01_51;20)
Put the mushrooms in a container that can sit overnight and add a couple spoonfuls of salt to draw the juices out. In addition to that salt, we’re going to add a couple of bay leaves. We’re going to mash it up and smoosh these mushrooms down, then we’re going to cover it and then let it set for about 10 minutes.

Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_02_39;25)
After 10 minutes check on your mushrooms to make sure they’ve already started reducing. Cover and set aside overnight in a safe place.

Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_03_07;21)
Once the mushrooms have completely soaked, add in 1 chopped up onion, the zest of 1 lemon and 1 tablespoon of finely grated horse radish. Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_03_18;27)We’re going to use a ¼ teaspoon of cloves, a pinch of cayenne and about ½ teaspoon allspice.Mushroom Ketchup(Time 0_03_28;00)

The last ingredient we need is a ¼ – ½ cup of cider vinegar. We’re going to stir up all these things together and then put it over the fire and let it simmer for about 15 minutes. Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_04_20;27)
Once it is done simmering allow it to cool a bit. Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_04_40;22)
Once cool enough pour it through a squeeze cloth into another container and squeeze all the liquid out.Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_05_01;20)

Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_05_26;12)
You can save both the liquid, but also the leftover dried mushrooms. You can use the dried mushrooms as is or grind it up to flavor other recipes.Mushroom Ketchup (Time 0_05_36;07)

There are some amazing complex flavors in this. You get the salt first, then some of the other spices, and the earthiness of the mushrooms. Some very complex and wonderful flavors.

 

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29u_FejNuks] Transcript of Video:

Many different 18th century recipes and a lot of writings refer to something called ketchup. Now ketchup in the 18th century wasn’t so much like this as it is more like this.

The word ketchup finds its roots in 17th century China. The Chinese had a similar sounding name for a concoction that consisted of pickled fish and spices. The British traders found this seasoning to be delightful. They brought it home and it quickly became the staple of the English and American diet.

Today we’re going to make an 18th century ketchup recipe with mushrooms. This would be a seasoning or a flavor that 18th century soldiers would be very familiar with.

James Townsend and Son carries all the equipment we’ll be using today and you can find each one of these things in our catalog or on our website. We’re starting off with 2 pounds of fresh mushrooms, but first a word of warning. We’re using common brown mushrooms in our recipe today. These mushrooms are native throughout Europe and North America but even common mushrooms can easily be mistaken for poisonous or even deadly varieties, so make sure to use something you know is completely safe.

With our mushrooms, we need to gently wipe these mushrooms off. We don’t want to rinse them off or wash them because that added liquid would dilute our final flavors.

And we’re going to add these to our tin cooking pot. We need to draw the juices out of our chopped up mushrooms. The best way to do that is to add a couple spoonfuls of salt. In addition to that salt, we’re going to add a couple of bay leaves. We’re going to mash it up, smoosh these mushrooms down in and then we’re going to cover it and then let it set for about 10 minutes.

We’ve let these set 10 minutes and they’ve already started reducing. The liquids being drawn out of the mushrooms and it’s already reduced in size a little bit. I’m going to transfer these into a milk pan here and then we can let this sit overnight.

I’m going to put this pie pan on top just to keep the critters out.

The first recipe for tomato ketchup was in 1801, but tomato ketchup did not become popular until the mid-19th century. The tomato plant is a member of the deadly nightshade family and many people considered it a deadly poison in the 18th century.

Well, let’s take a look.

There we have it. The mushrooms have completely soaked and now it’s time for the next step.

So now it’s time to add in 1 chopped up onion, the zest of 1 lemon and 1 tablespoon of finely grated horse radish. James Townsend and Son offers a pocket spice kit. It comes with salt and pepper, cinnamon, cayenne and thyme. It also comes with an empty vial and in that vial I’ve added cloves. In the recipe here, we’re going to use a quarter teaspoon of cloves. We’re going to use a pinch of cayenne and some allspice also, about a half a teaspoon.

And the last ingredient we need is a quarter to a half a cup of cider vinegar. We’re going to stir up all these things together and then we’re going to put this over the fire and let it simmer for about 15 minutes.

Joseph Plumb Martin’s book, sometimes called Private Yankee Doodle, many times it mentions when he’s eating, that they’re lacking sauce for their meat. More than likely this is what he was craving.

This is done simmering now. I’ve let it cool a little bit but now it’s time to pour it off and I’ve got our milk pan and I’ve got a squeeze cloth here. I’m going to pour this in here to let it cool.

Once this is cooled off, we’re going to take that cloth and bundle it up and squeeze all the liquid out.

There’re some amazing complex flavors in this. You get the salt first, then some of the other spices, the earthiness of the mushrooms, very complex, very wonderful flavor. We’re going to cork this up. We’re going to bottle it, cork it, and save it for our future recipes. So when you’re done with squeezing out the mushrooms, you don’t want to get rid of that. You don’t want to throw that out. That is especially good stuff. You dry that and you can either leave it like it is or you can grind it up. Some of this stuff you can sprinkle it almost like salt. It is really, really good stuff.

And there we have it, our ketchup. Our 2 pounds of mushrooms worked out to be a little over a pint of liquid ketchup. We also have our leftover dried mushrooms. Those are going to be great for future recipes. All the equipment that you saw here, all the utensils, it’s available on our website, in our print catalog, and don’t forget to follow us on Facebook.

 

Baking Simple Gingerbread

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_01_09;21)Gingerbread was a favorite treat in the 18th and 19th centuries. Many vendors sold it in the streets and markets. Many believe gingerbread possesses special medicinal properties, so it was even used to treat things like the sniffles.Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_00_57;15)

  • 2 cups Flour
  • ½ teaspoon Cinnamon
  • Pinch Allspice
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 2 tablespoons Freshly Grated Ginger
  • ½ teaspoon Pearl Ash or Baking Powder
  • 2 tablespoons Melted Butter
  • ½ cup Mild Molasses
  • 3 tablespoons Water

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_01_31;09)
Mix together flour, cinnamon, allspice, salt, ginger, and pearl ash or baking powder.Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_01_40;10)
In a separate bowl, mix together the melted butter, molasses and water. Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_02_04;02)

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_02_22;24)Carefully add the wet ingredients into the dry and mix until completely absorbed then turn out and knead until well mixed.Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_02_44;13)

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_02_52;09)
Roll out dough to about 1/8th inch thick and cut into desired shapes.Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_03_02;13)

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_04_05;08)Place on a well-greased cookie sheet and bake in oven at about 400 degrees for just a few minutes until golden brown.

Simple Gingerbread (Time 0_04_25;02)Aren’t they beautiful? They smell wonderful. Crunchy and spicy. A perfect treat for an autumn day.

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1Z2qwyHcPo]

Transcription of Video:

My papa is well occupied. He is preparing for the winter months ahead. He’s busy; ergo I thought I would take this opportunity to talk about gingerbread. Gingerbread was a favorite treat in the 18th and 19th centuries. Many vendors sold it in the streets and markets. I think it’s yummy. I have an idea! Let’s make some!

My papa told me never to play with fire, so I’m letting him start the oven. It needs to be a good hot oven. I’ll start with 2 cups of flour, and I’ll add to it ½ teaspoon of cinnamon, a pinch of allspice, a little bit of salt, about 2 tablespoons of freshly grated ginger and finally, I’ll add a ½ teaspoon of pearl ash, but wait, I don’t have pearl ash. Oh dear, what shall I do? I’ll use baking powder instead. Next, in a separate bowl, I’ll mix 2 tablespoons of melted butter with ½ cup of mild molasses and 3 tablespoons of water. Wow, this is really sticky. And now it’s time to mix the wet ingredients with the dry ingredients, and I’ll carefully stir this together until the liquid is absorbed. Then I will turn it out and knead it until it’s well mixed. Next, I’ll roll out the dough until it’s about 1/8th of an inch thick. I’ll use a cookie cutter to make pretty shapes. This one even looks like a flower. And I’ll put them on a well-greased  cookie sheet. Some of these cookies I’ll impress with a stamp, that will make a pretty design on the top. And some of them will roll into a snake and cut into little brown shapes. Now it’s time for papa to put them in the oven. He says the oven is about 400 degrees. That’s really hot.

It shouldn’t take very long at all, only a couple of minutes. And here they come.

Many believe gingerbread possesses special medicinal properties, so it was even used to treat things like the sniffles. Aren’t they beautiful? They smell wonderful. We’ll let these cool for a while. Yum, crunchy and spicy. A perfect treat for an autumn day. Maybe you should make some too.

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