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Propagating Wild Yeast for Reenactments


Today, if you asked 50 people about how to start a wild yeast culture for making sourdough bread, it’s likely you’ll get 100 different answers, but in reality, all it takes is a little bit of flour, some water and…

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September 29, 2017


Akara Recipe


Akara is a simple, easy to make snack that was frequently made in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Dried Black-eyed Peas Onions Parsley flour Boiling water Lard First, pulverize the dried black-eyed peas into very small pieces. Add to…

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A Fanciful Yet Easy Asparagus Soup


This delicious Asparagus Soup recipe from Elizabeth Cleland’s A new and easy methods of cookery (1755). Many of this recipe's techniques, including roux, food coloring, bone broth, and court-bouillon (the ingredients boiled in the soup that are removed before eating)…

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September 28, 2017


Rye and Indian Bread


This is called Rye and Indian bread, because it’s made of part rye flour and part Indian meal or sometimes we call it cornmeal. You can use just those two grains to make the flour, or you can add wheat…

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Simple Boiled Plum Pudding


Many people hear the word pudding today and they think about some little custardy stuff in a cup or something you buy at the grocery store in a box and mix it up with some milk. Pudding has a much…

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An Onion Soup Recipe from 1801


This recipe for onion soup is out of John Mollard’s 1801 cookbook, “The Art of Cooking Made Easy and Refined”. 4 oz. Butter 4 tbsps. Flour 8 midsized Onions of choice Salt 3 qts. Beef Stock 4 Egg Yolks 1…

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A White Pot Recipe


A White Pot with Raisins and Dates Serves 1 - 6 (depending on how polite you are) The name “White Pot” originates from the Devon region of England. But this sweet, buttery custard bread pudding, layered with sweetmeats (dried fruits)…

Also Known as a White Pudding


Master Wood Turner Erv Tschanz


In this special video, master wood turner Erv Tschanz shares his passion for the craft. Erv is one of several skilled artisans that sells handcrafted items through Jas. Townsend & Son. The treenware cherry wood plate being made in this…

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September 13, 2017


Weaver/Trapper Interview: Experiencing History Through Reenacting


We've been busy interviewing fellow reenactors for the purpose of inspiring and encouraging viewers who are interested in getting involved in historical reenacting but don't know how to begin. Today we interview Tony Baker, a weaver by trade, who has…

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Starting a Living History Group from Scratch


It took an idea and a group of friends, and it went from there. Albert Roberts tells the story of how the innovative historical interpretive group "The HMS Acasta" was born. http://ift.tt/2wQkO31 More great information! ***************************** Our Retail Website -…

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Page 1 of 69
A 200-Year Old Chicken Salad Recipe

A 200-Year Old Chicken Salad Recipe

This recipe is called a French Salad and it comes from Maria Rundell’s 1808 cookbook, “A New System of Domestic Cookery”, but even though it is a 19th century recipe, it is very similar to a number of different 18th century recipes for salads.

  • 2 or 3 Anchovies
  • 1 Chopped Shallot
  • ¾ cup chopped Parsley
  • 1 Tbsp. Olive or Almond Oil
  • 2 Tbsp. Lemon Juice
  • 2 Tbsp. Distilled Vinegar
  • 1 tsp. Mustard of choice
  • Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste
  • ¾ pound Roasted Chicken completely cooled

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Mince your anchovies and mix with the shallot and parsley. In another bowl, mix your oil with the lemon juice, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper and whisk together, then add it back to the other bowl and mix well.

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Next, break your chicken up into small pieces or strips and add it to the vinaigrette, completely coating the chicken. Cover your bowl and set aside in a cool place like your refrigerator for about 3 hours.

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This would traditionally have been served on toast, but can also be served as a sandwich or even straight out of the bowl.

Transcription of Video:

Today I’m going to be demonstrating a simple and refreshing chicken salad right out of the 18th century. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

Today’s recipe is called a French Salad and it comes from Maria Rundell’s 1808 cookbook, “A New System of Domestic Cookery”. I know, 1808, now that’s the early 19th century isn’t it, but it turns out that this is very similar to a number of different 18th century recipes for salad. Salads have been around for hundreds of years, even thousands of years. We know that the Romans had salads and especially in the 17th and 18th century, the French and Italians were known for their salads.

Now the salads, this one’s called a French salad, and that’s quite likely because the English were so fond of French cooking and in fact they imported French cooks to cook for them and so salads were kind of known as a French dish in the English culture.

In the 18th century, salads took on many different forms. Of course, they had their cabbages and their lettuces. In fact, today we know this as Romain lettuce, in the 18th century it was just Roman lettuce. They also had a variety of vegetables. Endive, radish tops, leeks, and green onions were commonly used. Some vegetable salads were raw and some were cooked or even boiled. Other salads used meats or pickled fish. They also used herbs in their salads, not just as accents, but as major ingredients. Things where we might never put into a salad.

Now many people think of flowers in a salad as a new thing, but in fact in the 18th century, flowers were very common in salads. They had periwinkle and violets, nasturtium, those were all in 18th century salad recipes. Sometimes they were fresh and other times they might be candied. They were favored for, not only their color, but their flavor also. Ivy did a video a year ago on how to candy violets. If you haven’t seen that video, I invite you to watch it. I’ll make sure to put a link down in the description of this video.

Now what we’re making today is a meat salad. Now the common element that seems to tie all these kinds of salads together was the dressing which was usually some kind of vinaigrette and that’s where we’re going to start.

I’m going to mince 2 or 3 anchovies and put those in a large bowl, mix them with 1 chopped shallot and about ¾ of a cup of chopped parsley. The recipe calls for oil, about a tablespoon of oil and I’m using olive oil here. Now occasionally they would have used, say an almond oil also in an 18th century recipe like this and that might be an interesting variation you could try.

So now let’s add the acid. We need about twice as much acid. The recipe calls just for vinegar. Now likely what they mean is a malt vinegar in the time period. I’m not using malt vinegar today, but actually half lemon juice, about 2 tablespoons, and half distilled vinegar. To this I’ll add a teaspoon of, say the mustard of my choice, along with a little bit of salt, a little bit of pepper and I’m going to whisk this together.

Now it’s time for the meat. I have here some roasted chicken. It’s about ¾ of a pound that I had from earlier. It’s completely cooled and I can start to add this to our vinaigrette. This needs to be covered and set aside for about 3 hours so that the flavors can blend. I suggest you store it in a cool place like your refrigerator.

So, let’s give this a try.

Mmm, wonderful blend of flavors. They’re all right there. You can get a little bit of that lemon juice, but it’s not overpowering and it works so well with that oil. It all blends together so well and those flavors are just boom, they’re just right there. So this one is really good and they likely would have served this over toast or, you know, in a modern context this would go really good on a croissant although they didn’t have anything quite like that in the 18th century, but still, and you could just eat it just like this, just right out of a bowl. It is great.

Well, there you have it, a delightful 18th century chicken salad. Really good, very simple. You should try this one out. You know, I really want to encourage you to share this video. If you enjoyed it please share it on Facebook or the social network of your choice. Whenever you do that, it is so helpful, so thank you for that and if you’re interested in living history, in reenacting, we’ve got this great little getting started course. It’s a free 7 or 8 episode course and it’s kind of fun. You’ll learn a lot, so definitely check that out. I’ll put a link down in the description section of this video and I want to thank you for coming along as we try out these really interesting recipes from history, as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Samp Cakes

Samp Cakes

Samp cakes have been a staple for Natives and Settlers for as long as corn has been around. This recipe has been found all over the Americas in different forms but it is foundationally the same recipe.

  • Cornmeal
  • Water
  • Dried Raspberries (optional)

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Mix your cornmeal with just enough water to make a thick paste. Add in dried raspberries or other dried fruit to taste.

You can cook these in two ways. The first is to wrap it securely in green leaves and place on the hot ashes of your fire for about 5 minutes, flipping halfway through. When your cake is firm it is done. The second is to bring a pot of water to a heavy rolling boil.

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Roll your cakes into a ball about the size of a golf ball and drop them into the pot. When your cake first goes in it will drop to the bottom, when it is ready to eat, it will float to the top.

These cakes taste nice dipped in maple syrup or as a side dish to any meal.

Transcript of Video:

Today, again I’m here at Connor Prairie, a premier living history site here in Fishers Indiana and we’ve got another great recipe for you. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

[Jon] I’m here today at Connor Prairie. It’s a little rainy. Hopefully you can hear me well. I’m with Duncan McKinnon and he’s going to show us about samp cakes. So, tell me a little bit about exactly what these samp cakes are.

[Duncan] Well, it’s pretty simple, it’s nothing more than just cornmeal and water, but you mix it very heavy. It has to hold together because your going to do it in boiling water and the water has to be to a real boil.

[Jon] So how long has this kind of food, these cakes, how long have they been made?

[Duncan] Probably as long as the Native People have had corn.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] It’s prevalent amongst all the tribes, East coast, here in the middle grounds, I’ve seen it in all my travels. I learned to do it from the Delaware. And the Delaware have their way of doing it and the other tribes have their way, but they’re all basically the same. It’s hard to say.

[Jon] So people have been doing it for a long time.

[Duncan] A long time.

[Jon] Well, let’s get started. What exactly do we need?

[Duncan] Alright, well we need cornmeal and we need the water, and I think what we might do first is do an ash cake while we’re waiting on our water to get a good rolling boil.

[Jon] Right.

[Duncan] So we’ll start with that.

[Jon] We’re adding dried red raspberries to this mixture to give these some flavor.

[Duncan] Alright, now what I’m going to do is I do them like this. It’s just the way that I do them, I roll them up. Some people would just take them and roll it up and roll the leaf around it, but I like to do mine like this. I mean, whatever you want to do is perfectly fine. Take and just strip me off

[Jon] Wait, that’s too thin.

[Duncan] Yeah, well, there you go.

[Jon] There we go.

[Duncan] Now, we can take that.

[Jon] Do you want another one?

[Duncan] This will be fine.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] I think this will hold it. And we’ll do it like that and then we’ll just tie it in there and then I’m just going to set it on the ash.

[Jon] So, we’ve got the one already going in the ashes here, but there’s another way to cook this, right?

[Duncan] It is, and what you do is just like you would a dumpling and just do it up in a ball similar to a dumpling, make sure that your water has got a really rolling boil.

[Jon] Okay, so it’s got to be boiling water?

[Duncan] It has to be boiling water and when I say boiling I mean rolling boil.

[Jon] and we want something a little bit bigger than a golf ball?

[Duncan] yeah right about like that.

[Jon] Right

[Duncan] And drop that in that water, it’ll go to the bottom and the way to tell when it’s done is that it will float to the top.

[Jon] It’ll rise to the top when it’s done.

[Duncan] Rise to the top when it’s done.

[Jon] Okay so, you’ve got the one on the ashes, but we do want to flip this over right?

[Duncan] Right, you flip it over and give both sides, total time, about 5 minutes. When it’s firm, it’s done, just take it right off and then unwrap it and it’s ready to eat.

[Duncan] You’ll find it to be a little bit dry, but with the berries in there, it gives it more flavor and if you wanted to try a little bit of that maple syrup on it.

[Jon] Yeah. Ah, that makes all the difference. If you didn’t have anything else

[Duncan] You’d be glad you had it.

[Jon] Right. Very similar to ash cakes, you would do with other kinds of flour like wheat flour, but soldiers, I mean this would be all through this time period.

[Duncan] Oh certainly, I mean that was just a staple. I mean, they lived on corn and cornbread.

[Jon] Right, so we’ve got the boiled kind, let’s try this out. Alright

[Duncan] now, like I said, it’s boiled, very much like a dumpling.

[Jon] Okay

[Duncan] You’re going to find it has the consistency of a dumpling.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] It’s not going to be as dry.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] And it has a little sweeter taste.

[Jon] It certainly does. It brings out a whole different set of flavors because it was boiled.

[Duncan] Yup. I think it brings out more of the flavor of the berry into it.

[Jon] Yeah I get some saltiness that I didn’t get out of the dry cooked one and the texture is nice and soft. Would you eat these with other things?

[Duncan] Oh yeah certainly. That would just be a complement to whatever you had

[Jon] Right

[Duncan] A sauce so to speak.

[Jon] A sauce but maybe it’s a meat or other things

[Duncan] that you might have had

[Jon] Right, it’s a side dish maybe.

[Duncan] Oh yeah, It would go good with squirrel.

[Jon] Squirrel, oh I’ll bet. I want to thank Duncan McKinnon so much for showing us exactly how to make these samp cakes and letting me sample them. They’re so unique and interesting. I hope you get a chance to try them out and I hope you get a chance to come to Connor Prairie so you can see this for yourselves. An amazing site. You can check out their website. I’ll put a link down in the description section. It’s ConnorPrairie.org make sure to check that out. Thank you so much for coming along with us as we experiment, as we try these flavors and the aromas of the 18th and early 19th century.

I want to give a special thanks to all the folks as Conner Prairie and make sure to check out their website. If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Harvest Succotash

Harvest Succotash

This is a traditional Native American soup that would have been enjoyed by the early pioneers. The Native Americans often called this dish the three sisters, because it contained corn, beans, and squash.

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For most of the year fresh ingredients were not available, and so they would have used dried corn and dried beans. In this recipe, we are going to be using dried hominy and dried beans.

  • Hominy
  • Beans
  • Meat
  • Butter
  • Onions
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1-2 Bay Leaves
  • Stock
  • Rutabaga
  • Carrot
  • Parsnip
  • Squash

Hominy is mature corn, usually dried and soaked in a caustic solution of hardwood ashes and water to remove the outer hull. The corn that we have today is generally of the soft kind called dent corn that was developed in the 19th century. In the 18th century, corn was typically of the flint variety, which was very hard.

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For this recipe, we are using a heritage corn that has its origins in corn over 2000 years old called Iroquois white corn available at the Iroquois whit corn project. They have also treated this corn exactly how the Native Americans in the 18th century would have done, so all the work of turning the corn into hominy has been done for us.

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First thing you need to do is soak your hominy and dried beans separately overnight. Be sure not to use your bean soaking water in the cooking of this dish.

Succotash is a dish that allows for a lot of variety. Some of the old travel journals mention these types of soup having wild game meat in them, and actually traditionally you’ll hear about bear meat being used in this type of dish. Bear meat is exceedingly good and tastes a lot like a fine beef. Since bear meat isn’t very popular anymore, I recommend using a fine chuck roast.

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Cube your meat into 1 inch squares and brown it in a little bit of butter along with some onions. Season it with salt, pepper, and a bay leaf or two. Next, add some stock. You can use chicken stock, beef broth, or just water. To this we’ll add the corn and beans, the first two sisters. Place the lid on this and let it simmer about 3 hours.

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Next, it’s time to add our vegetables. Add in the rutabaga, carrot, parsnip, and of course the third sister, squash. Drop them in and cook for another half hour or so until these are nice and tender.

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Our wonderful three sisters soup, or I might even call this a stew, is so rich and thick and the smell is wonderful. It’s full of a lot of different flavors and textures. I really recommend you give this a try.

Transcript of Video:

A few weeks ago we made a centuries-old summertime succotash recipe using fresh sweet corn and baby lima beans. If you haven’t seen that episode, I encourage you to go and see that now. Today I’m going to be making yet another traditional Native American soup that would have likewise been enjoyed by the early pioneers. The Native Americans often called this dish the three sisters because it contained corn, beans and squash. Thank you for joining me today on 18th Century Cooking.

As I mentioned earlier, in a previous episode we made a summertime succotash using fresh corn and fresh beans, but for most of the year, these fresh ingredients were not available, and so they would have used dried corn and dried beans. Today in this episode, we are going to be using dried hominy and dried beans as well.

Now, we hope to have an episode in the not too distant future about making hominy and hominy is mature corn. Usually it’s dried and soaked in a caustic solution of hardwood ashes and water to remove the outer hull. The hominy that we’re using today is of a very special variety. In the 18th century, corn was typically of the flint variety and the corn that we have today is generally of the soft kind which is a dent corn. It was developed in the mid-19th century. The other varieties of flint corn that we’ll have today are generally popcorn and some kinds of Indian corn that hasn’t been hybridized.

The flint corn we’re using today is a very special kind of corn. It’s a heritage corn that has its origins in corn that’s over 2000 years old. It’s called Iroquois white corn and its available online at the Iroquois white corn project. In addition to this being a heritage variety of flint corn, it’s already been turned into hominy for us and dried, so they’ve done a lot of the work already for us. It’s treated just exactly the way the Native Americans in the 18th century and before that would have done it as well as the early settlers.

To make this ready for us to use, all we need to do is soak it overnight the same way we need to do with our dried beans. You’ll want to soak these in their water until right before you use them. Be sure not to use your bean soaking water in the cooking of this dish. So let’s get started.

Some of the old travel journals mention these types of soup having wild game meat in them, and actually traditionally you’ll hear about bear meat being used in this type of dish and bear meat’s exceedingly good and tastes a lot like, say, a fine beef. Now, I don’t have bear meat today to use in this recipe, so I’m going to be using a fine chuck roast that I’ve already cubed into 1 inch squares.

Let’s brown this meat in a little bit of butter along with some onions and then I’ll season it with salt and pepper and a bay leaf or two. Next, I’m going to add some stock. Now, I’ve got some chicken stock here. You could use just water instead or even beef broth.

To this we’ll add the corn and the beans, the first two sisters.

I’m going to put the lid on this and let it simmer about 3 hours.

Our soup has been simmering for 2 ½ – 3 hours and now it’s time to add our vegetables to it and I’ve got 4 vegetables here. I’ve got rutabaga, I’ve got carrot, I’ve got some parsnip, and of course the third sister, which is the squash. These I’ll drop in and this will cook for another half hour or so until these are nice and tender.

Well, here is our wonderful three sisters soup, or I might even call this a stew. It’s so rich and thick and the smell is wonderful. Let’s find out what it tastes like.

Mmm

Now this is full of a lot of different flavors. I mean obviously we’ve got the meat and the wonderful broth flavors, but the interesting textures are what really, I think, sets this apart, and the corn is something totally different than you’re probably expecting. This corn is much larger in its size than a standard piece of corn and it’s got a really good texture. It’s not hard but it keeps holding its texture whereas the beans have almost broken down. They’re very soft, but the corn really is still holding its own in there so we have some really interesting texture with it, but we also have all these different flavors, so you get a piece of parsnip and you’re going to get a totally different flavor. You get a piece of rutabaga you get another flavor. You get the meat, you get the corn, you get the beans, it is really a wonderful medley of flavors. Each bite is almost just a little bit different. This is such a wonderful recipe and I hope you get a chance to try it.

All the things you’ve seen here today, the cooking implements and the clothing I wear, all these things are available in our print catalog or on our website, and it’s really the patronage of all our viewers out there that make it possible for us to make these videos week after week. This is so wonderful. I want to thank you for coming along with us as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Summer Succotash

Summer Succotash

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Succotash is a dish that has been around for centuries and is still very popular today. There are so many different ways this dish has been made with so many different ingredients. Native Americans, colonists, and Europeans enjoyed this dish while adding any ingredients that were fresh or available in their area during the season. This is a traditional Summer Succotash recipe.

  • 4 oz. diced Jowl or Regular Bacon (Optional)
  • 2-3 qt. Water
  • 8-10 Ears of Corn
  • 1 ½ cups of Beans (Lima or Kidney beans do well)
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper
  • Butter

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Brown your bacon, then add it to about 2-3 quarts of water and bring to a low boil. Trim the corn off your cobs so that you come up with about 4 cups worth of kernels. Be careful not to cut too closely to the cob as this will give a disagreeable taste to your dish.

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Once your water has come to a low boil, add in your corn cobs and beans and boil for about 20 minutes. If you use dried beans, make sure to soak them overnight beforehand.

After 20 minutes, remove the corn cobs and add in the corn kernels and season with some salt and black pepper. Bring to a boil for 15 more minutes. Top with a little bit of butter if desired before serving.

If you enjoy this, I encourage you to experiment with other beans, meats, squash, hominy, and other ingredients to make this recipe your own.

Transcription of Video:

Corn in the 17th and 18th century was extremely important for not only Native peoples but for European colonists also, and some of the dishes favored by the first nations peoples were also favorites of the colonists and we’re going to be making one of those dishes, succotash. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

Succotash is a very interesting dish. It remains popular, even to this day, in certain regions of the United States. The very first recipe that we found published for succotash is from the mid-1800’s but it’s a much older dish.

To learn about the earlier history of this food, you have to turn to old travel journals of European explorers and settlers. The word succotash is a phonetic mutation of a number of similar Native American words and the earliest that we found this dish by name, at least that we have found, is from Johnathan Carver’s book from 1778, “Travels throughout the Interior Parts of North America”. Here’s a little excerpt:

One dish which answers nearly the same as bread, is in use among a number of Eastern nations where Indian corn grows… it is reckoned extremely palatable by all the Europeans who enter their dominions. This is composed of their unripe corn as before described, and beans in the same state, boiled together with bears flesh, which renders it beyond comparison, delicious, and they call this food, succotash.

The earliest reference we found to succotash did not call it by name. It’s a reference from 1674 by Daniel Gookin and it is titled, “Historical Collections of the Indians in New England”.

Their food is generally boiled maize or Indian corn mixed with kidney beans or sometimes without. Also they frequently boil in this pottage fish and flesh of all sorts, either newly taken or dried, and also they mixed with the said pottage several sorts of roots as Jerusalem artichokes and ground nuts and other roots and pumpkins and squashes and also several sorts of nuts or masts as acorns, chestnuts, walnuts, these husked and dried and powdered, they thicken their pottage therewith.

By now the dictionaries have settled on a spelling for succotash and pretty much all the modern recipes you find for succotash are exactly the same, but as there were a number of ways to spell succotash in the 18th century, there were undoubtedly the same number of ways to fix it.

Today’s recipe is an adaptation. We’re taking the mid-19th century recipe and we’re adding to it some of the same things you’ll find in the earlier references.

I’m using diced jowl bacon for this, about 4 ounces. You can use regular bacon if you’d like. I’m going to brown this in our cast iron pot. As I read earlier, the Native Americans would have used, well basically any meat they had available. It’s likely that European settlers making this dish would use salt pork or bacon. If you’d like to make a vegetarian version of this dish, just leave out the meat. Once that’s browned, we’ll add 2 or 3 quarts of water and we’ll bring that up to a low boil.

While that’s warming up, I have to trim off the very last bit of corn here. I’ve got 8-10 ears. You want to be careful not to cut too closely to the cob. I’ll explain why in just a moment. I’ve got about 2 pounds or say 4 cups of trimmed corn kernels. In addition, we need a cup and a half of beans. Today I’m using baby lima beans.

Let’s add the beans and the corn cobs to this boiling water and I’m going to let this cook for about 20 minutes. If you trim your corn too close to the cob, then they’ll give a disagreeable taste to the dish. You can use canned or dried kidney beans in this instead of the lima beans. If you use the dried beans, make sure to soak them overnight beforehand.

Other vegetables may have been added to this really depending on what was available in the season. Now I’m making a summertime version of succotash here. You could do a fall version or a winter version with dried beans with dried hominy and sometimes adding something like squash or pumpkin. Hopefully in the near future we’ll have an episode on making hominy.

Jason Richards, one of our viewers, recently sent us a little cookbook on native American cooking called “Cherokee Cooklore”. We were fascinated to find a succotash recipe that had dried corn, dried beans and squash. Thank you so much for sending that little cookbook to us Jason.

Once the beans and the cobs have been boiled for, say, 20 minutes or so, remove the cobs and add the corn kernels. Season this with some salt and black pepper, then let it boil for another 15 minutes.

Well, let’s give this a try. This is something, if you want to top this off with a little bit of butter, you’ll probably enjoy that, so I’m going to add a little butter.

Mmm

Wonderful summertime flavors. You get that beautiful sweet corn flavor with the beans settled down very nicely in this. They don’t come out too much in this. You know, I’m not a big fan of lima beans, turns out really good in this dish. The juice is wonderful and of course you can’t go wrong with butter and pepper on there as a seasoning. I’m sure they may have not had those kind of choices but it’s still wonderful, wonderful flavors. A nice medley. And of course the bacon flavor comes out at the very end. Very nice. This dish is great with its roots in 17th century and even earlier Native American cooking.

All the things you’ve seen here today, you know all the cookware that we use, the bowls, the spoons, all these things are available on our website, or in our print catalog. I want to thank you for joining us today as we continue to experiment and try out these very interesting things, as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Carrot Pudding

Carrot Pudding

Today’s recipe, a 17th century carrot pudding, comes from The Compleat Cook by Rebecca Price.

Carrot Pudding (Time 0_00_27;18)

  • 6 ounces Breadcrumbs (or Cornmeal)
  • 4 Egg Yolks
  • 2 Egg whites
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 1-2 tablespoons Honey (or Maple Syrup)
  • 2 ounces Sack (Wine)
  • Pinch of Nutmeg
  • 8 ounces Shredded Carrots
  • 2 ounces Melted Butter

Mix together eggs well beaten, milk, honey and Sack.

Carrot Pudding (Time 0_01_43;00)

Add nutmeg, carrots, and breadcrumbs.

Carrot Pudding (Time 0_02_17;08)

Add in melted butter and enough milk to make the consistency of batter. Pour into well buttered dish and bake at 350 degrees for 35-40 minutes.

Carrot Pudding (Time 0_02_59;03)

Transcript of Video:

In the episode today, we’re going to be baking a 17th century carrot pudding. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking with James Townsend and Son.

Carrots are perfect for this time of year in the early spring. These root vegetables have been held over from last fall, so that’s what we’re going to cook with today.

Today’s recipe comes from The Compleat Cook by Rebecca Price. This book is available online. You can usually find it used. I don’t think it’s currently in print. Rebecca Price’s book is a manuscript collection of recipes from the late 17th century, somewhere around 1680. We can tell it’s a collection, because she calls this recipe a carrot pudding baked, my Lady How’s Recipe. I went digging through the old cookbooks and I found very similar recipes throughout the 18th century. There’s even one here in Primitive Cookery which is one of the cookbooks that we offer.

So this is a very simple recipe to put together. We start off with bread crumbs and what she calls for is the crumb of a two penny loaf. Now that’s very ambiguous. Loaves changed in size throughout this time period and it really depended on the sizes at the time as to how much a bread loaf weighed and in fact, the two penny loaf could be a two penny wheaten loaf or a two penny household loaf. I’m guessing from the idea that it’s Lady How’s recipe that we’re using a fairly high class bread, so it’s going to be the wheaten loaf and a two penny loaf, in the time frame, may have weighed, say, a little over a pound. I’m going to be adjusting this recipe and so we’re going to use just 6 ounces of breadcrumbs.

Let’s start off with the wet ingredients first. I’ve got 4 egg yolks, two egg whites. I’ve got my milk. This is 1 cup of milk, at least to start off with. The recipe calls for sweetening to taste. Here, we’re going to use honey, say, a tablespoon or two. A couple of ounces of sack. Sack, in the time period, is a wine used many times in cooking and it’s a kind of Sherry.

I’m going to put in just a pinch of nutmeg here. Now let’s add in our carrots, 8 ounces of shredded carrots, and finally, let’s add 6 ounces of bread crumbs, and the last thing we’re going to use here is 2 ounces of melted butter.

If your batter seems too dry, just add a little more milk until you get to a consistency that seems right. Now that our batter is mixed up, put it in a pre-buttered dish here. Some of the later recipes actually call for using a puff paste crust in this. There’s no reference to a crust in this particular recipe and I found that it works just fine by baking it straight in this dish.

Rebecca Price’s recipe suggests baking this for a half hour. Mine took a little bit longer, 35-40 minutes. I would bake it at approximately 350 degrees.

Let’s give this a try. Mmm, mmm, very, very nice. It’s really, it’s not too sweet, but it’s still plenty sweet. It’s almost like a bread pudding. In fact, in the later recipes, the 18th century ones, many times double the amount of bread crumbs in this, so it would be very much more like, say, a bread pudding with a little bit of carrot added. The sack and the butter have got some wonderful flavor in here. I think it’s one of the missing sauces that’s not popular today. Having a sack and butter sauce, very, very good, especially on this. The carrots are really good, but they don’t stand out so much that if you’ve got a picky eater, they won’t mind the carrots in this.

I was thinking about this recipe in a North American context and variations on it. In New England, white bread crumbs aren’t necessarily readily available in the 18th century, so what are you going to use instead? Cornmeal, I’ll bet, would be a great alteration. So if you put cornmeal in instead of the bread crumbs, and maybe instead of the honey, maple syrup, you’d have a great New England variation on this recipe.

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