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A Well-To-Do Rice Pudding


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April 4, 2018


A Poor Man’s Rice Pudding


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Macaroni And Cheese


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Barley Soup


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Pink Pancakes!


Perfect for Valentines Day! Pink Pancakes featuring last week’s candies lime peel! Visit Our Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Help support the channel with Patreon ▶ https://www.patreon.com/townsend ▶▶ Sign up for the YouTube Mailing List! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/youtube_list.htm ▶▶ Twitter ▶ @Jas_Townsend…

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Candied Lime Peel


A simple and delicious sweet meat from the 18th Century. #townsendspeel Visit Our Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Help support the channel with Patreon ▶ https://www.patreon.com/townsend ▶▶ Sign up for the YouTube Mailing List! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/youtube_list.htm ▶▶ Twitter ▶ @Jas_Townsend Facebook…

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A perfect recipe just in time for Christmas! This is another German recipe translated by Kayla and Karen at Old Salem Museums and Gardens. #townsendslittleantlers Visit Our Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Old Salem’s Website ▶ http://www.oldsalem.org/ ▶▶ Help support the…

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March 23, 2018


Yellow Turnips


The translation for these “Yellow Turnips” was made possible by Kayla and Karen at Old Salem Museums and Gardens, who are presently translating two 18th Century German cookbooks. Visit Our Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Old Salem’s Website ▶ http://www.oldsalem.org/ ▶▶…

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March 22, 2018


Open Fire Roast Beef


There is nothing like cooking over an open fire! Today we are doing a very simple recipe for Roast Beef from “American Cookery” by Amelia Simmons. Visit Our Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Help support the channel with Patreon ▶ https://www.patreon.com/townsend…

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Apple Puree


Another delicious, German recipe given to us by Kayla and Karen at Old Salem Museums and Gardens, who are presently translating two period German cookbooks. Check Out Our Brand New Website! ▶ http://www.townsends.us/ ▶▶ Old Salem’s Website ▶ http://www.oldsalem.org/ ▶▶…

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Page 1 of 73

The Freshest Breakfast Sausage (1808 Recipe)

We have another very special episode today! Marie Schultz, from Genesee Country Village & Museum in Mumford, NY, shares with us a very simple but absolutely delicious recipe for fresh pork sausage. Marie is a long-time historical interpretor at the village. For today’s episode, she draws upon Hannah Glasse’s 1808 book “Plain and Fancy” as well a similar recipe passed down from her great-grandmother. We hope you enjoy this! If you’re ever in the Rochester, NY, area, be sure to put Genesee Country Village & Museum on your itinerary! You won’t regret it!

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Pork a la Normand At Conner Prairie

In today’s episode, Jon is transported back to 1836 as he visits the folks once again at Prairietown, part of Conner Prairie Interactive History Park in Fishers, Indiana. Mrs. Barker (portrayed by historical interpreter Kim McCann) takes no guff from Jon regarding the appearance of this dish. While it wasn’t the “purdiest” thing we’ve ever eaten here, it may have been one of the tastiest! There was none left by the time Aaron and Kevin finished breaking down the equipment! For a recipe on how to prepare this dish, visit our cooking blog “Savoring The Past” at this link: http://www.townsends.us/blog/pork-a-la-normand/

Be sure to visit Conner Prairie’s website! http://ift.tt/15XFwf8

This video channel is made possible by the patronage of our customers. Be sure to visit our website: http://townsends.us/

Interested in historical reenacting? Click here for our getting started series!

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Click here for the latest cooking video – http://bit.ly/2c9L7d9

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Preparing Salt Pork


Preparing Salt Pork – 18th Century Cooking Series S1E5
Salt pork was a very popular meat in the 18th century. In this video we explain how to prepare you own.

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Cheshire Pork Pie

Cheshire Pork Pie

  • Salt Pork
  • Apples
  • Pepper
  • Salt
  • Butter
  • Water
  • Top and Bottom Pie Crusts

In our recipe, we’re going to be using salt pork.

Meat Pies (Time 0_01_24;00)

This is true 18th century style salt pork, not something like you might find on your grocery store bacon shelf, but a leaner cut hard packed in salt. We’re boiling our salt pork today for about an hour, so we don’t need to rinse it off quite as much as we normally would before using it. We’re going to slice it thin and then season it with a little pepper.

Meat Pies (Time 0_01_09;19)

Apples have been enjoyed for centuries by people. “Pippins” is a common name for apples in the 18th century. When choosing your pie apples, if you’re not just picking off a local tree, you want to look for Jonathans or Winesaps, something that’s particularly a pie apple, a tart yet sweet apple that holds together and doesn’t turn to applesauce. What you don’t want is a red delicious apple. Red delicious apples are very 20th century. They’ve been bred for their size and their color, not their taste, and they don’t make a very good pie apple at all.

Meat Pies (Time 0_01_31;25)

Peel, core, and slice your apples thin.

In a pie pan, place your bottom pie crust then layer your pork and apples alternately until full.

Meat Pies (Time 0_01_48;09)

Meat Pies (Time 0_01_59;21)

Once your pie is packed, add some salt and pepper to give it some flavor.

Meat Pies (Time 0_02_13;21)

Place some butter on top and add a couple of teaspoons of water.

Meat Pies (Time 0_02_43;08)

The amount of water you need to add to this pie totally depends on the kind of apple you use. If you use a Mackintosh apple, they’ll turn to something like apple sauce, so you don’t need to add very much water. If you have a firmer crisper apple, you might need a little bit more water.

Meat Pies (Time 0_03_39;00)

Place the second pie crust on top to cover it up, then trim and seal the edges. Now cut some vent holes in the top of the crust.

Meat Pies (Time 0_07_58;02)

Place in the oven with spacers to keep it from burning on the bottom. This will bake about 10 to 15 minutes depending on the temperature of your oven.

Meat Pies (Time 0_08_29;12)

Transcription of Video:

Pies are common fare for everyone in the 18th century. We’re going to bake a couple of pies today using different baking techniques.

Our first pie is going to be a Cheshire pork pie with pork and apples. We’re going to bake it in our oven.

Our next pie will be a mock passenger pigeon pie and we’re going to bake that in our Dutch oven.

Apples have been enjoyed for centuries by people. Apples were popular in the 18th century and today the dish we’re making is called Cheshire pork pie with pippins. “Pippins” is a common name for apples in the 18th century.

In our recipe, we’re going to be using salt pork. This is true 18th century style salt pork, not something like you might find in your grocery store bacon shelf, but a leaner cut hard packed in salt like we’ve discussed in a previous video.

Likewise, we’ve sliced our pippins here and they’re ready to use in our pie. As we make our pie, what we’re going to do is we’re going to put in a layer of pork and then we’re going to put in a layer of apple.

We’re boiling our salt pork today for about an hour. Because we’re boiling it, we don’t need to rinse it off quite as much as we normally would have before using it. We’re going to slice it thin and then we’re going to season it with a little pepper. I’ve got our pie packed up here. Now it’s time to add some spices to it. I’m going to add some salt and some pepper to this to season it well so it’s got some flavor to it.

All these things come right out of our spice kit. A little bit more there. There, that’s good. Now we’re going to put some butter on top that will melt down into our pie here. We’re going to add about 2 tablespoons of water to give it a little bit of moisture.

The amount of water you need to add to this pie totally depends on the kind of apple you use. If you use a Mackintosh apple, they’ll turn to something like apple sauce, so you don’t need to add very much water. If you have a firmer crisper apple, you might need a little bit more water.

So, for pie apples, if you ‘ve got any choice and you’re not just picking off a local tree, if you go to a local grocery store, you want to look for Jonathans or Winesaps, something that’s particularly a pie apple, a tart yet sweet apple that holds together and doesn’t turn to applesauce. What you don’t want is a red delicious apple. Red delicious apples are very 20th century, they’ve been bred for their size and their color and not for their taste and they don’t make a very good pie apple at all.

We’re going to put our second pie crust on here to cover this up, we’re going to trim and seal the edges. Now let’s cut some vent holes and work on the mock pigeon pie.

Passenger pigeons were one of the most populous birds in the 18th and 19th century. There were billions of these birds on the planet. They were almost a scourge there were so many of them. They were very popular and yet you would find them in a lot of recipes. There were so many of these birds that there were reports of flocks that were a mile wide and 300 miles long that would take 14 hours to fly over. There were so many of them they would blot out the sun. Obviously we can’t use passenger pigeons today since the last one died almost 100 years ago, so today we’re going to use as our substitute a Cornish game hen.

We’ve simmered 2 Cornish game hens with onions and then we picked the meat off and put it in the bowl. Now let’s brown up a little bit of flour in some butter.

I’m going to add some stock, let this simmer a little bit. We’ll also season it with a little salt, pepper, and thyme.

By the way, our pie plates here are thrown by our master potter Gary Neater right here in Indiana and they have a lead free food safe glaze.

We’re going to put our pulled meat into a pie crust. We’re going to pour our warmed sauce on top of that, seal it up with the other pie crust, and it’s ready to bake.

There we go. We’re going to bake this mock pigeon pie in a Dutch oven. Let’s talk about these Dutch ovens for a minute. Dutch ovens like this are a specifically 18th century and North American improvement on a 17th century design. The lip at the top is specifically designed to keep the coals from falling off so the coals will stay on the top, and the legs at the bottom keep it so the air can flow underneath and keep the coals alive underneath. We’ve got our Dutch oven preheated. I kind of left it in the fire pit here and it’s good and warm. We have to get our pit ready for this. We’ve got our coals underneath. It’s time to put the pie in. We need to keep the pie off the bottom of the Dutch oven so we’re going to put a couple of S hooks in here to space the pie pan off the bottom so the bottom doesn’t burn.

We’ve got plenty of space around the outside edge so we can reach in there without burning ourselves. Now let’s put the lid on.

Deciding exactly how many coals you want to use is a bit of a matter of judgement. Each person is going to have to get used to that. You need to practice. I put a ring of coals around the top of the lid here leaving the center a little bit open. Same thing at the bottom, there’s a little bit of opening at the very center to not get it too hot. Each one of those is going to be just a little bit different though. Let’s check out our earthen oven and see if it’s ready for the pork pie.

Okay, our oven is all baked down into coals. Our soot is burned off so this is ready to go. You can see about how to use the oven better in the baking bread video. Anyway, I’m going to scrape the coals out and get this ready for the pie.

I’m going to put S Hooks inside this one also to serve as a trivet. I don’t want to burn the bottom.

There we go. We’re going to have to watch this. This one might be a little bit too hot, so we’re going to keep an eye out on it. Let’s put the door on it though.

It’s been about 10 or 15 minutes and I think this is probably ready to go. Take a quick look, whoa! It’s ready to come out. You don’t want it to go too long. Wow, look at that, looks just about perfect.

We’ll I’m sure we’ve left this set long enough. Let’s pull it off the fire and set this aside so it can cool off enough that I can take the pie out of the oven. I’ll take a quick gander here, set that lid aside. There’s a lot of steam in there. Look at that. There you go.

I’m going to let that cool off a minute before we take it out.

I can’t wait to cut these open and try them. They smell really good.

Mmm, these are excellent. Definitely you should try something like this. If this isn’t a normal thing for you, step out of your normal comfortable cooking, get into something like this. Meat pies or something that’s a little bit different. Everybody will enjoy it. All the things you’ve seen here today you can check out and see on our website or in our print catalog and don’t forget to follow us on Facebook.

A Pork Pie With A Standing Crust

A Pork Pie with a Standing Crust

In a previous post, I presented three common types of pastry crust used in the 18th century: the standing crust, the puff paste, and the short paste. These are fairly broad categories of crusts, and recipes for numerous variations for each have been published across the spectrum of 18th century cookbooks.

In the video above, Jon uses one variation of the standing crust to make a pork pie. It uses rendered suet for it’s fat ingredient.

The pork pie recipe we used is from Maria Eliza Rundel’s 1807 book, “A New System of Domestic Cookery.”

Rundel’s recipe is for a larger standing pie. She recommends baking it in a slow oven because of the amount and density of the meat filling.

The final addition of a lear or a gelatin gravy (omitted in Rundel’s recipe) is based on the very common 18th century practice of adding gravies, i.e., broths, caudles (thickened broths), or gelatin gravies, to pies after they are baked.

Also contrary to Rundel’s recipe, we made our pies individual-serving size. There are many period cookbooks that suggest such meat pies can be made large or small. We’ve down-sized the recipe below to make two of these smaller versions.

Rundel’s recipe may be an ancestral version of the modern traditional Melton-Mowbray pies that are still very popular in portions of the U.K. today. Regardless of whether the Melton-mowbray pie can be traced specifically to this recipe or not,  it is easy to conclude that the famed pies have roots which date back to at least the late 18th century.

Meat Pies were not constrained to standing crusts. Puff pastes or even short crusts can be used as well.  Richard Briggs in his 1788 cookbook, “The English Art of Cookery,” when speaking of a wide variety of meat pies, suggests this:

The most fascinating aspect of our experiments with standing crusts was the differences we noticed in the effects that various types of fat had on the crust. Butter, lard, and muscle fat (what is commonly referred to in period books as “drippings”) do not set up solid at room temperature as suet does. Consequently, standing crusts made with these fats or any combination of them can be worked even when cold. Crusts made with suet, however, must be work when the dough is hot. The moment the dough cools down, any attempt to work it will cause it to crack.

By the way, if you’re concerned about using suet and whether it may contribute a meaty flavor to your crust, it is my experience that properly rendered suet imparts the least amount of flavor to a crust than any of the other fats.

So here are the ingredients we used, proportioned for two generously-portioned individual-serving pork pies (two people can easily be filled with one of these pies, however, you may find yourself somewhat unwilling to share). The video at the beginning of this post will explain the directions.

For the Crust:

2-1/2c flour
6T rendered suet
1/2c plus 2T water
1/2t salt
1 egg  plus 1t Water, beaten, for egg wash

Be sure to watch the video below on how to form a small standing crust. We used a drinking glass for our a mold, however, pie dollies are available on line. If you choose to use rendered suet instead of the lard/butter combination we used in the video, be sure to form your crusts while the dough is hot. If the dough grows too cold to work, microwave the dough for a few seconds or cover the dough and set it near the fire.

For the Filling:

1 Pound Pork Shoulder, trimmed of fat and silver skin, and coarsely chopped
1/2 t Salt
1 t Black Pepper, ground

For the Lear (Gelatin Gravy)

Option 1:
1 Pig’s foot (have it quartered by your butcher)
enough water to cover

Option 2:
2 packets of Unflavored Gelatin
1-1/2 c water

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