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Propagating Wild Yeast for Reenactments


Today, if you asked 50 people about how to start a wild yeast culture for making sourdough bread, it’s likely you’ll get 100 different answers, but in reality, all it takes is a little bit of flour, some water and…

Which Yeast (Time 0_00_55;12)

September 29, 2017


Akara Recipe


Akara is a simple, easy to make snack that was frequently made in the 18th and early 19th centuries. Dried Black-eyed Peas Onions Parsley flour Boiling water Lard First, pulverize the dried black-eyed peas into very small pieces. Add to…

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A Fanciful Yet Easy Asparagus Soup


This delicious Asparagus Soup recipe from Elizabeth Cleland’s A new and easy methods of cookery (1755). Many of this recipe's techniques, including roux, food coloring, bone broth, and court-bouillon (the ingredients boiled in the soup that are removed before eating)…

Asp6

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September 28, 2017


Rye and Indian Bread


This is called Rye and Indian bread, because it’s made of part rye flour and part Indian meal or sometimes we call it cornmeal. You can use just those two grains to make the flour, or you can add wheat…

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Simple Boiled Plum Pudding


Many people hear the word pudding today and they think about some little custardy stuff in a cup or something you buy at the grocery store in a box and mix it up with some milk. Pudding has a much…

Plum Pudding (Time 0_11_05;10)


An Onion Soup Recipe from 1801


This recipe for onion soup is out of John Mollard’s 1801 cookbook, “The Art of Cooking Made Easy and Refined”. 4 oz. Butter 4 tbsps. Flour 8 midsized Onions of choice Salt 3 qts. Beef Stock 4 Egg Yolks 1…

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A White Pot Recipe


A White Pot with Raisins and Dates Serves 1 - 6 (depending on how polite you are) The name “White Pot” originates from the Devon region of England. But this sweet, buttery custard bread pudding, layered with sweetmeats (dried fruits)…

Also Known as a White Pudding


Master Wood Turner Erv Tschanz


In this special video, master wood turner Erv Tschanz shares his passion for the craft. Erv is one of several skilled artisans that sells handcrafted items through Jas. Townsend & Son. The treenware cherry wood plate being made in this…

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September 13, 2017


Weaver/Trapper Interview: Experiencing History Through Reenacting


We've been busy interviewing fellow reenactors for the purpose of inspiring and encouraging viewers who are interested in getting involved in historical reenacting but don't know how to begin. Today we interview Tony Baker, a weaver by trade, who has…

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Starting a Living History Group from Scratch


It took an idea and a group of friends, and it went from there. Albert Roberts tells the story of how the innovative historical interpretive group "The HMS Acasta" was born. http://ift.tt/2wQkO31 More great information! ***************************** Our Retail Website -…

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Page 1 of 69
Paw Paw Pudding

Paw Paw Pudding

Paw paws are a small yellow fruit native to the Eastern United States, but has a very short harvest season of only a week. Because of this short harvest season, it is hard to find recipes for this delicious fruit so we have adapted a pumpkin pie recipe from Amelia Simons’ “American Cookery” cookbook.

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  • Pie Crust
  • 1 cup Paw Paw Flesh
  • 1 cup Milk
  • 1 Egg
  • 2-3 tbsp. Molasses
  • 1 tsp. Allspice
  • 1 tsp. ground Ginger

Make sure to remove all seeds from the paw paw flesh and mash it up. Whisk in milk and egg getting the mixture as smooth as possible. Mix in your molasses and spices. This mixture will be a little thin but will thicken up as it cooks.

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Pour the mixture into your pie crust and bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely, probably even overnight before slicing.

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Transcript of Video:

[Ivy] Hey dad, look what I found!

[Jon] Ah, let’s take a look! Wow, I’ll bet this is the leaf from the tree they came from?

[Ivy] What are they?

[Jon] These are paw paws. I’ve got an idea for these. Let’s take them to the kitchen.

[Jon] So paw paws are a strange exotic kind of fruit.

[Ivy] They look like a cross between a potato and an avocado.

[Jon] I mean, obviously, these really green ones, these aren’t done, but when they start to turn yellow, maybe with little brown spots like this, like a banana starts to get overripe, that’s when you know they’re getting ripe.

[Ivy] What do they look like on the inside?

[Jon] Well, on the inside, well, let’s cut this one open and we’ll find out. There we are, so look at that.

[Ivy] Wow, it’s yellow.

[Jon] Yeah, they’re very yellow on the inside and look at those seeds. Here you can pick one out.

[Ivy] They look kind of like beans.

[Jon] Definitely has an interesting fruity smell to it, like maybe some mango, that’s kind of what it looks like here, or apple flavor.

[Ivy] Mmm, that’s good.

[Jon] Is it like a sweet fruity flavor? Let’s see. Mmm, look at the texture though. It’s very soft and almost like a custard on the inside. A very soft and gentle flavor, but nice and sweet. You know they’re not very rare. They actually grow in most of the Eastern United States and all the way up into Eastern lower Canada, but the harvest season on these is very short. They’re really only ripe and ready to go for a couple of weeks, maybe only one week in the year and the forest animals can smell them and they’ll come and get them.

[Ivy] I can see why, they’re delicious.

[Jon] They do smell really good and you can tell how they could probably smell them from miles away. They also don’t travel well, so we’ll probably never find them in something like a grocery store. You might find them in a local farmer’s market or if you don’t find them there, you going to have to find them yourself in the woods.

[Ivy] Did people eat them in the 18th century?

[Jon] Actually they were eaten by the Native Americans and the settlers alike in the 18th century and you do find references to them, but you don’t really find them in any cookbooks, probably because they weren’t available all the time, so you never find a recipe until much later on in the 19th century. There’s also references to Louis and Clark feeding on these almost entirely at the very end of their journey’s in 1806. Louis and Clark were coming back and all their supplies were gone and so they had nothing but paw paws to survive on for a short period of time. So, let’s pretend we’re settlers and you’ve brought a whole bunch of paw paws to me, in fact you have brought a whole bunch of paw paws to me today and we can’t eat them all right away so what are we going to do with them?

[Ivy] I would find a recipe that I really liked that would preserve them.

[Jon] Right, but we don’t have any recipes that they had in the 18th century, so maybe we would…

[Ivy] I would adapt the recipe for something similar.

[Jon] And that’s exactly what they would have done in the 18th century. I’ve got a good idea for something that would probably cook up nicely. Hand me that little cookbook over there. So, this is Amelia Simons’ “American Cookery” cookbook. She did this one in 1796. It’s got a perfect recipe that I think will work with this. It’s called a pumpkin pudding. It’s really much what we would call a pumpkin pie, so we’ll adapt that recipe for these paw paws. Let’s get started.

[Jon] So, to get started, I’ve got a pie plate here with our pie crust in it and I’m going to set this aside and we’ll work on the filling. And the filling I’ve got here is about 1 cup of the paw paw flesh. We’ve got it taken out. I’m not sure if I got all the seeds, so I want you to mash that up and make sure we got all the seeds out.

[Jon] Good, that looks like we don’t have any seeds in there so go ahead and lift that out. I’m going to add in about 1 cup of milk. We’ll add that to it, and I’ve got 1 egg we’ll add to this. Pretty simple recipe. There’s our egg. And now we can whisk it. Now the trick with this is to get it ask smooth as we can. We don’t want it to be too lumpy. And this fruit can be a little stringy, you know, it changes its consistency, so we’re really going to have to get it mixed up well.

[Jon] Good, you’ve got that nice and smooth. We’ll add 2-3 tablespoons of this molasses and now we can add some spices. I’ve got a teaspoon of allspice and a teaspoon of ground ginger. We’ll add those in and keep mixing. Okay, it looks like you’ve got the consistency pretty well. There’s still a little lumpy but I don’t think it’s going to make any difference in this particular recipe.

[Ivy] It looks really runny.

[Jon] Well, you know, it is very, very thin, but I’ve made this recipe before and I thought at first, the first time I made it, that it was not going to work, but I baked it anyway, and it turned out perfect, so I’m going to trust that this will work out just fine, so let’s pour this into our pie plate, here we go.

[Jon] Okay, our pie plate is filled nicely. This looks good. It’s ready to go in the oven, so we’ll bake this at 350 degrees for maybe an hour and 20 minutes. I’ll put this in the oven.

[Jon] Before we slice this pie, we need to make sure that it’s cooled completely, probably even overnight.

[Ivy] I’m surprised how dark it is.

[Jon] You know, it is nice and dark. It looks very rich. Part of the color is going to be from the molasses and part of it’s just what’s happening with the paw paw. Let’s find out how it tastes.

[Jon] Well, boy, I’m really trying to find the flavor for this. It’s a wonderful flavor. It’s got a little bit of pumpkin pie in it but it’s much fruitier. It has an amazing little flavor to it. Boy, this is really good.

[Ivy] I can taste the allspice in it.

[Jon] Yeah, it’s wonderfully flavored. Thanks for bringing those paw paws in. They turned out to be tremendous in this dish and I want to thank you for coming along as we experiment. You never know what these things are going to turn out like, so as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century. And a special thanks to Jim Hoffman for his assistance in this episode.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Samp Cakes

Samp Cakes

Samp cakes have been a staple for Natives and Settlers for as long as corn has been around. This recipe has been found all over the Americas in different forms but it is foundationally the same recipe.

  • Cornmeal
  • Water
  • Dried Raspberries (optional)

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Mix your cornmeal with just enough water to make a thick paste. Add in dried raspberries or other dried fruit to taste.

You can cook these in two ways. The first is to wrap it securely in green leaves and place on the hot ashes of your fire for about 5 minutes, flipping halfway through. When your cake is firm it is done. The second is to bring a pot of water to a heavy rolling boil.

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Roll your cakes into a ball about the size of a golf ball and drop them into the pot. When your cake first goes in it will drop to the bottom, when it is ready to eat, it will float to the top.

These cakes taste nice dipped in maple syrup or as a side dish to any meal.

Transcript of Video:

Today, again I’m here at Connor Prairie, a premier living history site here in Fishers Indiana and we’ve got another great recipe for you. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

[Jon] I’m here today at Connor Prairie. It’s a little rainy. Hopefully you can hear me well. I’m with Duncan McKinnon and he’s going to show us about samp cakes. So, tell me a little bit about exactly what these samp cakes are.

[Duncan] Well, it’s pretty simple, it’s nothing more than just cornmeal and water, but you mix it very heavy. It has to hold together because your going to do it in boiling water and the water has to be to a real boil.

[Jon] So how long has this kind of food, these cakes, how long have they been made?

[Duncan] Probably as long as the Native People have had corn.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] It’s prevalent amongst all the tribes, East coast, here in the middle grounds, I’ve seen it in all my travels. I learned to do it from the Delaware. And the Delaware have their way of doing it and the other tribes have their way, but they’re all basically the same. It’s hard to say.

[Jon] So people have been doing it for a long time.

[Duncan] A long time.

[Jon] Well, let’s get started. What exactly do we need?

[Duncan] Alright, well we need cornmeal and we need the water, and I think what we might do first is do an ash cake while we’re waiting on our water to get a good rolling boil.

[Jon] Right.

[Duncan] So we’ll start with that.

[Jon] We’re adding dried red raspberries to this mixture to give these some flavor.

[Duncan] Alright, now what I’m going to do is I do them like this. It’s just the way that I do them, I roll them up. Some people would just take them and roll it up and roll the leaf around it, but I like to do mine like this. I mean, whatever you want to do is perfectly fine. Take and just strip me off

[Jon] Wait, that’s too thin.

[Duncan] Yeah, well, there you go.

[Jon] There we go.

[Duncan] Now, we can take that.

[Jon] Do you want another one?

[Duncan] This will be fine.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] I think this will hold it. And we’ll do it like that and then we’ll just tie it in there and then I’m just going to set it on the ash.

[Jon] So, we’ve got the one already going in the ashes here, but there’s another way to cook this, right?

[Duncan] It is, and what you do is just like you would a dumpling and just do it up in a ball similar to a dumpling, make sure that your water has got a really rolling boil.

[Jon] Okay, so it’s got to be boiling water?

[Duncan] It has to be boiling water and when I say boiling I mean rolling boil.

[Jon] and we want something a little bit bigger than a golf ball?

[Duncan] yeah right about like that.

[Jon] Right

[Duncan] And drop that in that water, it’ll go to the bottom and the way to tell when it’s done is that it will float to the top.

[Jon] It’ll rise to the top when it’s done.

[Duncan] Rise to the top when it’s done.

[Jon] Okay so, you’ve got the one on the ashes, but we do want to flip this over right?

[Duncan] Right, you flip it over and give both sides, total time, about 5 minutes. When it’s firm, it’s done, just take it right off and then unwrap it and it’s ready to eat.

[Duncan] You’ll find it to be a little bit dry, but with the berries in there, it gives it more flavor and if you wanted to try a little bit of that maple syrup on it.

[Jon] Yeah. Ah, that makes all the difference. If you didn’t have anything else

[Duncan] You’d be glad you had it.

[Jon] Right. Very similar to ash cakes, you would do with other kinds of flour like wheat flour, but soldiers, I mean this would be all through this time period.

[Duncan] Oh certainly, I mean that was just a staple. I mean, they lived on corn and cornbread.

[Jon] Right, so we’ve got the boiled kind, let’s try this out. Alright

[Duncan] now, like I said, it’s boiled, very much like a dumpling.

[Jon] Okay

[Duncan] You’re going to find it has the consistency of a dumpling.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] It’s not going to be as dry.

[Jon] Okay.

[Duncan] And it has a little sweeter taste.

[Jon] It certainly does. It brings out a whole different set of flavors because it was boiled.

[Duncan] Yup. I think it brings out more of the flavor of the berry into it.

[Jon] Yeah I get some saltiness that I didn’t get out of the dry cooked one and the texture is nice and soft. Would you eat these with other things?

[Duncan] Oh yeah certainly. That would just be a complement to whatever you had

[Jon] Right

[Duncan] A sauce so to speak.

[Jon] A sauce but maybe it’s a meat or other things

[Duncan] that you might have had

[Jon] Right, it’s a side dish maybe.

[Duncan] Oh yeah, It would go good with squirrel.

[Jon] Squirrel, oh I’ll bet. I want to thank Duncan McKinnon so much for showing us exactly how to make these samp cakes and letting me sample them. They’re so unique and interesting. I hope you get a chance to try them out and I hope you get a chance to come to Connor Prairie so you can see this for yourselves. An amazing site. You can check out their website. I’ll put a link down in the description section. It’s ConnorPrairie.org make sure to check that out. Thank you so much for coming along with us as we experiment, as we try these flavors and the aromas of the 18th and early 19th century.

I want to give a special thanks to all the folks as Conner Prairie and make sure to check out their website. If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Harvest Succotash

Harvest Succotash

This is a traditional Native American soup that would have been enjoyed by the early pioneers. The Native Americans often called this dish the three sisters, because it contained corn, beans, and squash.

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For most of the year fresh ingredients were not available, and so they would have used dried corn and dried beans. In this recipe, we are going to be using dried hominy and dried beans.

  • Hominy
  • Beans
  • Meat
  • Butter
  • Onions
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 1-2 Bay Leaves
  • Stock
  • Rutabaga
  • Carrot
  • Parsnip
  • Squash

Hominy is mature corn, usually dried and soaked in a caustic solution of hardwood ashes and water to remove the outer hull. The corn that we have today is generally of the soft kind called dent corn that was developed in the 19th century. In the 18th century, corn was typically of the flint variety, which was very hard.

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For this recipe, we are using a heritage corn that has its origins in corn over 2000 years old called Iroquois white corn available at the Iroquois whit corn project. They have also treated this corn exactly how the Native Americans in the 18th century would have done, so all the work of turning the corn into hominy has been done for us.

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First thing you need to do is soak your hominy and dried beans separately overnight. Be sure not to use your bean soaking water in the cooking of this dish.

Succotash is a dish that allows for a lot of variety. Some of the old travel journals mention these types of soup having wild game meat in them, and actually traditionally you’ll hear about bear meat being used in this type of dish. Bear meat is exceedingly good and tastes a lot like a fine beef. Since bear meat isn’t very popular anymore, I recommend using a fine chuck roast.

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Cube your meat into 1 inch squares and brown it in a little bit of butter along with some onions. Season it with salt, pepper, and a bay leaf or two. Next, add some stock. You can use chicken stock, beef broth, or just water. To this we’ll add the corn and beans, the first two sisters. Place the lid on this and let it simmer about 3 hours.

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Next, it’s time to add our vegetables. Add in the rutabaga, carrot, parsnip, and of course the third sister, squash. Drop them in and cook for another half hour or so until these are nice and tender.

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Our wonderful three sisters soup, or I might even call this a stew, is so rich and thick and the smell is wonderful. It’s full of a lot of different flavors and textures. I really recommend you give this a try.

Transcript of Video:

A few weeks ago we made a centuries-old summertime succotash recipe using fresh sweet corn and baby lima beans. If you haven’t seen that episode, I encourage you to go and see that now. Today I’m going to be making yet another traditional Native American soup that would have likewise been enjoyed by the early pioneers. The Native Americans often called this dish the three sisters because it contained corn, beans and squash. Thank you for joining me today on 18th Century Cooking.

As I mentioned earlier, in a previous episode we made a summertime succotash using fresh corn and fresh beans, but for most of the year, these fresh ingredients were not available, and so they would have used dried corn and dried beans. Today in this episode, we are going to be using dried hominy and dried beans as well.

Now, we hope to have an episode in the not too distant future about making hominy and hominy is mature corn. Usually it’s dried and soaked in a caustic solution of hardwood ashes and water to remove the outer hull. The hominy that we’re using today is of a very special variety. In the 18th century, corn was typically of the flint variety and the corn that we have today is generally of the soft kind which is a dent corn. It was developed in the mid-19th century. The other varieties of flint corn that we’ll have today are generally popcorn and some kinds of Indian corn that hasn’t been hybridized.

The flint corn we’re using today is a very special kind of corn. It’s a heritage corn that has its origins in corn that’s over 2000 years old. It’s called Iroquois white corn and its available online at the Iroquois white corn project. In addition to this being a heritage variety of flint corn, it’s already been turned into hominy for us and dried, so they’ve done a lot of the work already for us. It’s treated just exactly the way the Native Americans in the 18th century and before that would have done it as well as the early settlers.

To make this ready for us to use, all we need to do is soak it overnight the same way we need to do with our dried beans. You’ll want to soak these in their water until right before you use them. Be sure not to use your bean soaking water in the cooking of this dish. So let’s get started.

Some of the old travel journals mention these types of soup having wild game meat in them, and actually traditionally you’ll hear about bear meat being used in this type of dish and bear meat’s exceedingly good and tastes a lot like, say, a fine beef. Now, I don’t have bear meat today to use in this recipe, so I’m going to be using a fine chuck roast that I’ve already cubed into 1 inch squares.

Let’s brown this meat in a little bit of butter along with some onions and then I’ll season it with salt and pepper and a bay leaf or two. Next, I’m going to add some stock. Now, I’ve got some chicken stock here. You could use just water instead or even beef broth.

To this we’ll add the corn and the beans, the first two sisters.

I’m going to put the lid on this and let it simmer about 3 hours.

Our soup has been simmering for 2 ½ – 3 hours and now it’s time to add our vegetables to it and I’ve got 4 vegetables here. I’ve got rutabaga, I’ve got carrot, I’ve got some parsnip, and of course the third sister, which is the squash. These I’ll drop in and this will cook for another half hour or so until these are nice and tender.

Well, here is our wonderful three sisters soup, or I might even call this a stew. It’s so rich and thick and the smell is wonderful. Let’s find out what it tastes like.

Mmm

Now this is full of a lot of different flavors. I mean obviously we’ve got the meat and the wonderful broth flavors, but the interesting textures are what really, I think, sets this apart, and the corn is something totally different than you’re probably expecting. This corn is much larger in its size than a standard piece of corn and it’s got a really good texture. It’s not hard but it keeps holding its texture whereas the beans have almost broken down. They’re very soft, but the corn really is still holding its own in there so we have some really interesting texture with it, but we also have all these different flavors, so you get a piece of parsnip and you’re going to get a totally different flavor. You get a piece of rutabaga you get another flavor. You get the meat, you get the corn, you get the beans, it is really a wonderful medley of flavors. Each bite is almost just a little bit different. This is such a wonderful recipe and I hope you get a chance to try it.

All the things you’ve seen here today, the cooking implements and the clothing I wear, all these things are available in our print catalog or on our website, and it’s really the patronage of all our viewers out there that make it possible for us to make these videos week after week. This is so wonderful. I want to thank you for coming along with us as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Pound Cake

Pound Cake

This wonderful traditional pound cake comes from Amelia Simons’ 1796 cookbook, “American Cookery”. It’s a simple recipe that I think you’re going to find a little surprising. In fact, her recipe is too simple, it only has a few lines to put together this seemingly complex cake, so we had to play detective to figure out how to make this one.

  • 1 lb. Butter
  • 1 lb. Sugar
  • 1 lb. Flour
  • 1 lb. Eggs (9 large or 10 medium)
  • 1 jill Rose Water (optional)
  • ½ Nutmeg grated
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

With so little information in the original recipe, you might be tempted to throw all the ingredients together, mix them up, and toss them in the oven for the 15 minutes that it says, but then you would end up with a raw mess. By studying other 18th century cake recipes, we are given a bit more information on how to bring this cake together.

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We need to start with creaming our butter with our sugar. You want your butter soft but not melted. In the 18th century they would have mixed this by squeezing it together with their hands, but you can speed this process up by using a modern mixer on high for about 5 minutes.

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Next you can add in your spices. When it comes to spices, Amelia gives us basically no suggestions leaving this completely up to the cook. Many recipes like this in the 18th century would use caraway seeds, but for this recipe we’re going to be using some nutmeg and a little bit of cinnamon, both also very popular 18th century spices for this kind of a cake. Feel free to experiment with your own spices.

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This is also when you would add in your rose water if you are using it. Rose water was very popular in the 17th and early 18th centuries in cooking and we kind of think of it as a spice, but really it’s more of an aromatic, a perfume, that we use in these recipes. Another aromatic that was very popular is orange blossom water. You can find either one of these either online or in Mediterranean markets. They started falling out of favor in English cooking by the end of the 18th century. When we tried this recipe out on different people, some thought the flavor was intriguing while others disliked it. If you’re looking for a traditional taste, I suggest you experiment with this, but if you can’t find them, it’s okay to leave it out.

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The only clue as to the leavener in this cake that we are given are the eggs in the ingredients. In the 17th and 18th centuries it was popular to use eggs as a leavening agent by beating the eggs full of air and as the eggs cook the bubbles expand. If you are going to do this by hand, you’ll need to whisk your eggs for about an hour, however, if you would like to speed this up, you can use a modern appliance on high for not more than 15 minutes. Make sure that your whisk is free from all butter or the eggs will not whip up properly.

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Once your eggs are whipped up, carefully fold them into your butter mixture, then sift in the flour little by little. Try not to over work this as we’re trying to keep as much of the air in the eggs as possible.

When we look at the baking time in this recipe, it tells us to bake for 15 minutes, so we know that this is not meant to be cooked all at once. In the 1700’s the term cake was applied to anything from the size of a great cake which could be 40 pounds or more, such as the 12th night cake recipe we did earlier, or something much smaller. Something that today we would call a cookie.

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So there are several ways you could cook this. There is nothing wrong with cooking it as a cake. You can bake it in a bunt pan that is well buttered or a cake ring at about 325 degrees for about 1.5-2 hours. If you wish to cook it as Amelia Simons’ meant it, you will need a cookie sheet with paper or well buttered tart tins. If you are using paper, it won’t need to be treated at all. Once the cookies are completely cool, the paper will easily peel away.

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Bake at about 325 degrees for 15-20 minutes. Either way, make sure to preheat your oven.

These have a really nice soft cakey texture to it and an interesting flavor.

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If you would like to store these for long term, you can double bake them to dry them up and they will last for quite a while.

Transcription of Video:

Today we’re going to be making a wonderful traditional pound cake. This recipe comes from Amelia Simons’ 1796 cookbook, “American Cookery”. It’s a simple recipe that I think you’re going to find a little surprising. Thank you for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

The term Pound Cake today generally refers to a cake that’s baked in a round form pan, like a bunt pan and they’re generally much more dense than, say, a typical cake. In the 18th century, however, the term pound cake really comes from the amount of ingredients that are in this recipe, so generally a pound of butter, a pound of sugar, a pound of flour, and a pound of eggs and in Amelia Simons’ recipe, that’s exactly what we’ve got. Amelia also suggests a couple of other things. A jill of rose water and spices to taste.

So Amelia Simons’ recipe is too simple. It’s only got just a few lines, really, to put together this seemingly complex cake. I mean, we might be tempted to just throw the ingredients together, mix them up and toss it in the oven, but if you study other 18th century cake recipes from maybe a slightly earlier time period and books that have a little more information, we find out that we can’t do that with this recipe. We actually have to use these other techniques from other cookbooks to make this properly.

We need to start with creaming our butter with our sugar. Now this butter has been softened but not melted. Now in the 18th century they would have mixed this by squeezing it together with their hands. You can speed this process up by using a modern mixer on high for about 5 minutes.

When it comes to spices, Amelia gives us basically no suggestions. She leaves this completely up to the cook. Now many recipes in the 18th century would use something like caraway seeds. That’s very popular for something like this, but today we’re going to be using some nutmeg and a little bit of cinnamon, both also very popular 18th century spices for this kind of a cake.

Now that this is light and fluffy, we can add in our spices. I’ve got about a half a nutmeg here that’s grated up and maybe a teaspoon or a little bit less of nice ground cinnamon and if you’re going to be trying the rose water, now would be the time to add that in and then we’re going to mix this up for another minute or two.

So let’s talk a little bit first about rose water, and rose water is used in this or she mentions rose water in this recipe. Rose water was very popular in the 17th century, early 18th century in cooking and we kind of think of it as a spice but really it’s more of an aromatic, a perfume that we use in these recipes. Another aromatic that’s very popular is the orange blossom water and you can find either one of these still available either online or in Mediterranean markets. By the end of the 18th century, by the end of the 1700’s, these things were really falling out of favor in English cooking.

We tried this recipe out a number of times with the rose water and we tried this on different people and some people really thought the flavor was intriguing and others disliked it because it reminded them of the flavor of soap. If you’re looking for that kind of traditional taste, I suggest you go ahead and try to find some rose water or orange flower blossom water to experiment in this. If you can’t find those, it’s okay to leave them out.

Most modern cakes today use a chemical leavening to make them light and fluffy. Either baking soda or baking powder. In the 17th and 18th century, cakes most often used either a yeast leavener or an egg leavening. In other videos, we pointed out that Amelia Simmons uses a very crude version of a chemical leavening in some of her recipes. In other recipes, she uses yeast as a leavener. In this recipe, she doesn’t mention any leavening at all, but we have lots of eggs, so what we need to do here is beat a lot of air into these eggs. As it cooks, these air bubbles will expand. That’s going to give us our leavening.

If you wish to make this recipe as they did in the 1700’s, you’ll need to whisk this for about an hour, hand held, with a whisk. If you’re going to be using a modern appliance, you’re going to need to whisk this on high for not more than 15 minutes. If you’re using medium eggs, you’ll need 10 eggs. If you’re using large eggs, just 9 will do. Before you start to whisk these eggs, make sure your whisk is butter free or the eggs will not whip up properly. Carefully fold the eggs into your butter mixture and then sift in the flour little by little. Try not to over work this. We’re trying to keep as much of the air in the eggs as possible.

Now, you can bake this in a bunt pan if you would like. You’ll need to butter it very well and you’ll bake it at about 325 degrees for say an hour and a half to two hours. Other recipes we’ve found used a cake ring. Either a tin cake ring or a wood cake ring that was lined outside with paper and the inside buttered, but Amelia Simons’ recipe suggests baking this for just 15 minutes. Now this gives us another clue into how this version was made.

The word cake in the 1700’s could apply to a great cake and we covered something like the great cake when we did our 12th night cake recipe. Now these cakes were huge, sometimes they were 20-30-40 pounds or more, but the word cake can also refer to something much smaller. Something that we, today would call a cookie, and in fact, the first kind of reference, at least in American cookery and English cookery, is Amelia Simons’ reference to the word cookie here that she borrows from the Dutch, so if we take into account this 15-minute cooking time, there is no way that this could be baked as a big cake in a bunt pan or in one of these wooden forms. This most likely was baked as a cookie on a baking sheet, probably on paper. They might have baked them in small little tart tins that were buttered or even in a little paper tray or cup that we’ve seen some references to in 18th century cookery. We won’t need to butter the paper or treat it in any way. Once these cookies cool all the way off, we’ll be able to just peel the paper away.

If you’re baking these at home, they’ll bake for 15-20 minutes at a temperature of about 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure to preheat your oven. You’ll need to watch these closely so they don’t burn. Let them cool completely before you try to remove them from the paper.

Let’s give these a try. They look wonderful. It’s actually got a really nice soft texture to it.

They have a wonderful, simple yet complex flavor to them. Nice and sweet, again really, really good texture. Nice and soft. You can definitely taste the nutmeg and the cinnamon in there. It would be really interesting to have these with a little bit of that rose water. These are wonderful and really simple and can you imagine if you baked 4 pounds of these guys? It’s likely that you either had a really big crowd to feed or you would double bake these to dry them up so that they would last for quite a while, and let’s look at one of these little bigger ones, this cupcake version here, and I can break this open here and you can see the texture. It’s got a really nice cakey texture to it. This is not dense at all. Really, all that air whipped in there did a tremendous job of leavening this. It’s really good.

Mmm

Well, this one turned out great! I love these. In fact, I could eat them all day. I’m not going to. You should definitely try this one out. They are excellent! If you are interested in living history or reenacting, make sure to check out our getting started course. It’s really simple, you sign up for it on email, it’s free and you get special videos about how to get started with a little bit of in depth information. You’ll love the series. Also, make sure to check out our website and you can get one of our print catalogs from our website. This is really good. I want to thank you for coming along as we try these things out, as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Summer Succotash

Summer Succotash

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Succotash is a dish that has been around for centuries and is still very popular today. There are so many different ways this dish has been made with so many different ingredients. Native Americans, colonists, and Europeans enjoyed this dish while adding any ingredients that were fresh or available in their area during the season. This is a traditional Summer Succotash recipe.

  • 4 oz. diced Jowl or Regular Bacon (Optional)
  • 2-3 qt. Water
  • 8-10 Ears of Corn
  • 1 ½ cups of Beans (Lima or Kidney beans do well)
  • Salt
  • Black Pepper
  • Butter

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Brown your bacon, then add it to about 2-3 quarts of water and bring to a low boil. Trim the corn off your cobs so that you come up with about 4 cups worth of kernels. Be careful not to cut too closely to the cob as this will give a disagreeable taste to your dish.

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Once your water has come to a low boil, add in your corn cobs and beans and boil for about 20 minutes. If you use dried beans, make sure to soak them overnight beforehand.

After 20 minutes, remove the corn cobs and add in the corn kernels and season with some salt and black pepper. Bring to a boil for 15 more minutes. Top with a little bit of butter if desired before serving.

If you enjoy this, I encourage you to experiment with other beans, meats, squash, hominy, and other ingredients to make this recipe your own.

Transcription of Video:

Corn in the 17th and 18th century was extremely important for not only Native peoples but for European colonists also, and some of the dishes favored by the first nations peoples were also favorites of the colonists and we’re going to be making one of those dishes, succotash. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

Succotash is a very interesting dish. It remains popular, even to this day, in certain regions of the United States. The very first recipe that we found published for succotash is from the mid-1800’s but it’s a much older dish.

To learn about the earlier history of this food, you have to turn to old travel journals of European explorers and settlers. The word succotash is a phonetic mutation of a number of similar Native American words and the earliest that we found this dish by name, at least that we have found, is from Johnathan Carver’s book from 1778, “Travels throughout the Interior Parts of North America”. Here’s a little excerpt:

One dish which answers nearly the same as bread, is in use among a number of Eastern nations where Indian corn grows… it is reckoned extremely palatable by all the Europeans who enter their dominions. This is composed of their unripe corn as before described, and beans in the same state, boiled together with bears flesh, which renders it beyond comparison, delicious, and they call this food, succotash.

The earliest reference we found to succotash did not call it by name. It’s a reference from 1674 by Daniel Gookin and it is titled, “Historical Collections of the Indians in New England”.

Their food is generally boiled maize or Indian corn mixed with kidney beans or sometimes without. Also they frequently boil in this pottage fish and flesh of all sorts, either newly taken or dried, and also they mixed with the said pottage several sorts of roots as Jerusalem artichokes and ground nuts and other roots and pumpkins and squashes and also several sorts of nuts or masts as acorns, chestnuts, walnuts, these husked and dried and powdered, they thicken their pottage therewith.

By now the dictionaries have settled on a spelling for succotash and pretty much all the modern recipes you find for succotash are exactly the same, but as there were a number of ways to spell succotash in the 18th century, there were undoubtedly the same number of ways to fix it.

Today’s recipe is an adaptation. We’re taking the mid-19th century recipe and we’re adding to it some of the same things you’ll find in the earlier references.

I’m using diced jowl bacon for this, about 4 ounces. You can use regular bacon if you’d like. I’m going to brown this in our cast iron pot. As I read earlier, the Native Americans would have used, well basically any meat they had available. It’s likely that European settlers making this dish would use salt pork or bacon. If you’d like to make a vegetarian version of this dish, just leave out the meat. Once that’s browned, we’ll add 2 or 3 quarts of water and we’ll bring that up to a low boil.

While that’s warming up, I have to trim off the very last bit of corn here. I’ve got 8-10 ears. You want to be careful not to cut too closely to the cob. I’ll explain why in just a moment. I’ve got about 2 pounds or say 4 cups of trimmed corn kernels. In addition, we need a cup and a half of beans. Today I’m using baby lima beans.

Let’s add the beans and the corn cobs to this boiling water and I’m going to let this cook for about 20 minutes. If you trim your corn too close to the cob, then they’ll give a disagreeable taste to the dish. You can use canned or dried kidney beans in this instead of the lima beans. If you use the dried beans, make sure to soak them overnight beforehand.

Other vegetables may have been added to this really depending on what was available in the season. Now I’m making a summertime version of succotash here. You could do a fall version or a winter version with dried beans with dried hominy and sometimes adding something like squash or pumpkin. Hopefully in the near future we’ll have an episode on making hominy.

Jason Richards, one of our viewers, recently sent us a little cookbook on native American cooking called “Cherokee Cooklore”. We were fascinated to find a succotash recipe that had dried corn, dried beans and squash. Thank you so much for sending that little cookbook to us Jason.

Once the beans and the cobs have been boiled for, say, 20 minutes or so, remove the cobs and add the corn kernels. Season this with some salt and black pepper, then let it boil for another 15 minutes.

Well, let’s give this a try. This is something, if you want to top this off with a little bit of butter, you’ll probably enjoy that, so I’m going to add a little butter.

Mmm

Wonderful summertime flavors. You get that beautiful sweet corn flavor with the beans settled down very nicely in this. They don’t come out too much in this. You know, I’m not a big fan of lima beans, turns out really good in this dish. The juice is wonderful and of course you can’t go wrong with butter and pepper on there as a seasoning. I’m sure they may have not had those kind of choices but it’s still wonderful, wonderful flavors. A nice medley. And of course the bacon flavor comes out at the very end. Very nice. This dish is great with its roots in 17th century and even earlier Native American cooking.

All the things you’ve seen here today, you know all the cookware that we use, the bowls, the spoons, all these things are available on our website, or in our print catalog. I want to thank you for joining us today as we continue to experiment and try out these very interesting things, as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

Questions & Answers with Jas. Townsend & Son: 2016, October 20

Index of Topics:

00:15 – If you want to do the first two recipes in the oven what temperature would you set it at? Or is it not even really possible to do without a fire? (Cooking Pumpkins over an Open Fire)
00:58 – Is that Acorn Squash? (A Harvest Succotash)
01:15 – I am guessing that you can also prepare this in a slow cooker on high? (A Harvest Succotash)
01:35 – Would you be able to replace the cloth with something else such as a plastic bag? Or does the cloth provide a unique way of cooking the dish? (A Delicious Lamb in a Blanket)
02:15 – What would you recommend for vegetarians in place of the suet? Is there a vegetarian suet available? (Plum Pudding)
03:14 – How about Asiago cheese? Would that be a hard enough cheese? (A Delicious Cheese Spread, Welsh Rabbit from 1788)
03:39 – I don’t understand how a whole onion with clove spikes could serve as seasoning. Is the onion sliced or perforated? (French Beans in a Ragout)
05:09 – Why do you never use a fork in your videos and instead use a knife? Did many people in the 18th century have no forks or is there another reason for that? (Paw Paw Pudding)
06:37 – Why would you want to dye your eggs with a ground up scale bug? Do they have any benefit besides dying eggs? Where/why did people come up with ideas like this? Are there more natural ways to dye your eggs? (A 240-Year-Old Recipe for Pickling Eggs)
08:34 – Didn’t you mention a few months ago that you were going to make 18th century cheese videos. Are you still going to make them, or is it not happening?
09:04 – I wanted to say congratulations and also thank you for taking time to speak with me at Five Medals this weekend, you were very helpful! I’m looking forward to coming by to visit the shop!
09:40 – I’ve always wanted to participate in these events but have been a bit afraid. It’s so out of my comfort zone! Maybe one day! (What is Your Favorite Part of a Historical Event?)
11:26 – Announcement: Conner Prairie Oven Class

 

Tags:
modernize old recipe, how to cook old recipe, acorn squash in succotash, how to use acorn squash, cooking boiled pudding, vegetarian suet, cooking with hard cheese, old style seasoning, eating with a knife, natural food dye, natural food coloring, bugs in food dye, beets for dye, how to make cheese

Plum Pudding

Plum Pudding

This is a wonderful variation of a plum pudding called hunter’s pudding that uses raisins for the plum. This dish was popular from the mid-18th century to the 20th century, found in British cookbooks and also popular in colonial America. Plum puddings were often associated with special occasions, served during certain holidays or when visitors came to visit. A hunter’s pudding was likely reserved for various special occasions such as a formal hunt, but that’s not to say ordinary people didn’t enjoy a hunter’s pudding on occasion. This recipe comes from “The Lady’s Assistant”, a 1775 cookbook published from Charlotte Mason’s manuscripts. This is a half batch, so if you want to make a full size batch, all you’ll need is double the ingredients and add an hour to the cooking time.

  • ½ lb. Flour
  • ½ lb. Suet (Kidney Fat)
  • ½ lb. Currants (dried, seedless, Corinthian Grapes)
  • 4 oz. Raisins
  • 2 tbsp. Candied Orange Peel
  • 2 tbsp. Candied Citron
  • 1 tsp. Nutmeg
  • 3-4 tbsp. Brandy
  • 4 Eggs
  • 1 cup Cream

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Preparing this pudding’s going to be very easy. We’re just going to add all of our dry ingredients plus our sweetmeats and mix well. Next whisk your eggs together in a separate bowl then combine your cream and brandy with the eggs. Once those are completely mixed, add them to your dry ingredients. This should make a pretty thick paste.

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Now when you’re going to boil a pudding, there are a few things you have to have ready to go. You need a couple of pots of water boiling.

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A large one will be for boiling the pudding itself. The smaller pot will be used to refill the water as it boils away in the larger one. You’ll also need a clean piece of cloth for each of the puddings you’re going to boil.

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Linen makes a really good pudding cloth, because the water makes the fibers swell up and the weave even tighter. You can also use cotton osnaburg. You’ll also need a stout cord to tie the cloth off with.

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Put your cloth into your boiling water for a few minutes to scald, then dust the pudding side with flour and lay in a bowl. Place your pudding dough into the cloth then tie the bag tightly around the dough.

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Place your pudding into the boiling water for 3 hours. Make sure to only replenish this water with boiling water. You want this water to not stop boiling at any time, because that will increase your cooking time.

Once your pudding has finished boiling, you will want to dip it in cold water for a few seconds to make it easier to remove the cloth without damaging the surface of your pudding.

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If you don’t want to spend 4 or 5 hours boiling a pudding at your next event, you can cook these ahead of time. You can cook these the week before if you leave them in their pudding cloth, then you can take them to the event. When you’re ready to use them, you can either boil them for an hour right before you need them or you can slice them cold and then either fry them or broil them.

These puddings were usually served with a sauce. The most common type is equal parts of butter, sugar, and sac.

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This pudding is very dense and rich. With all the raisins it’s very sweet. Compared to today’s palate, it was likely this would be the sweetest thing people of the 18th century would eat all year. This would make a great addition or finish to any celebration. You really should try these.

Transcript of Video:

Today I’m going to be doing something a little different. A dish that was popular all the way from the mid-18th century to the 20th century, found in British cookbooks and also popular in colonial America. We’re going to be making a hunter’s pudding. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking with Jas Townsend and Son.

A hunter’s pudding is a type of plum pudding and a plum in this context means raisins. Plum puddings were often associated with special occasions, served during certain holidays or when visitors came to visit. The name hunter’s pudding may be a bit deceiving. We need to be careful about assuming that it was a favorite dish for backwoodsmen. Rather, a hunter’s pudding was likely a pudding that would have been reserved for various special occasions such as a formal hunt, but that’s not to say ordinary people didn’t enjoy a hunter’s pudding on occasion. Hunter’s puddings were popular from the mid 1700’s up until the beginning of the 20th century. Let’s get started.

We’re going to be making a recipe from “The Lady’s Assistant”, a 1775 cookbook published from Charlotte Mason’s manuscripts. We’re making half batches today, so if you want to make a full size batch, all you’ll need is double the ingredients. It will change the cooking time, so we’ll talk about that as we cook it, but to start, let’s look at the ingredients.

I’m using a half pound of flour and a half pound of suet. Now when I say suet, I mean kidney fat. In a previous episode, we explored the difference between suet and hard muscle fat and when it comes to making puddings, there’s a huge difference, so if you go to your butcher to ask for suet, make sure he gives you kidney fat. If you can’t find kidney fat to use or if you have neither the time nor the inclination to render it yourself, Jas Townsend and Son now carries Atora shredded suet. This suet is made from rendered kidney fat. It’s stabilized with a little flour. Because it’s rendered properly, it doesn’t need refrigerating.

In addition, we’re using a half a pound of currants. Unlike the fleshy red berries that go by the same name and are related to the gooseberry, these currants are small dried seedless Corinthian grapes. Also in our pudding we’ll be using about 4 ounces of raisins. Now raisins in the 18th century had seeds in them so they had to be cut open and seeds removed before they could be used in a recipe like this. There were different kinds of raisins in the 18th century. The best of the raisins were dried in the sun as opposed to dried in ovens. These were called raisins of the sun and most of the time they were imported in jars so they would be many times called jar raisins. The best of these raisins were called Malaga or Muscato raisins. They were grown in Spain and imported throughout much of Europe and North America. Our modern raisins are similar in quality to a midlevel jar raisin of the 18th century while having the convenience of being seedless.

Next we’re going to be adding a couple of tablespoons of candied orange peel and candied citron. Our recipe will also use about a teaspoon of nutmeg and 3-4 tablespoons of brandy. Now here’s something interesting about the addition of brandy into these puddings, it started to be added in the second half of the 18th century and in many of the recipes they find that the addition of the brandy helped in the preservation of the pudding and many times its noted that the puddings can be kept for up to 6 months if you keep the pudding still wrapped in its pudding cloth and kept up out of reach. This allowed cooks to make multiple puddings at once, serving one immediately and the others later on.

Finally, back to our recipe, we’ll need 4 eggs and 1 cup of cream. Now that’s it for the ingredients. Now that we’ve gathered them up, let’s put this pudding together.

Preparing this pudding’s going to be very easy. We’re just going to add all of our dry ingredients plus our sweetmeats.

And don’t forget to add the nutmeg.

That’s mixed quite well.

Okay, now that our dry ingredients are done, let’s move on to our wet ingredients. Let’s whisk our eggs together.

And then we’re going to add in our cream and our last wet ingredient, our brandy.

Now let’s add this to our dry ingredients.

It should make a pretty thick paste.

Now when you’re going to boil a pudding, there are a few things you have to have ready to go. You need a couple of pots of water boiling. Our large one will be for boiling the pudding itself. The smaller pot we’ll use to refill the water as the water boils away. You’ll also need a clean piece of cloth. One for each of the puddings you’re going to boil. Linen makes a really good pudding cloth. The water makes the fibers swell up and the weave even tighter. You can also use cotton osnaburg. Go ahead and scald these cloths.

You’ll also need a stout cord to tie the cloth off with. Remove the cloths from the boiling water and dust each with a little flour, then set each one aside, flour side up, into a bowl. Gather your pudding dough and place it on top of the cloth.

Tie the bag tightly around the dough.

Now it’s time to put this in the boiling water and boil it for 3 hours. You want to make sure to only replenish this water with boiling water. You want this water to not stop boiling at any time, because that will increase your cooking time.

Now like I said, this is a half size pudding. If you’re going to be doing a full size pudding, you’ll want to boil this for 4 hours.

Okay, the hunter’s pudding has boiled 3 hours. You’ll need a bucket of cold water on hand. By dipping the hot pudding in the cold water for a few seconds it will make it easier to get the cloth off without damaging the surface of your pudding.

If you don’t want to spend 4 or 5 hours boiling a pudding at your next event, you can cook these ahead of time. You can cook these the week before if you leave them in their pudding cloth, then you can take them to the event, when you’re ready to use them, you can either boil them for an hour right before you need them or you can slice them cold and then either fry them or broil them.

These puddings were usually served with a sauce and the sauce we’re using here is the most common type which is equal parts of butter, sugar, and sac.

Let’s give these a try.

And they’re a very dense and rich kind of food here. These are chalk full of raisins and they’re nice and sweet. In fact, compared to today’s palate, 18th folks were not used to such sweet things, so it’s likely that this would be the sweetest thing they would eat all year long. These would make a great addition or finish to a nice period meal and because you can fix them the week ahead of time, they’re a perfect kind of thing you can pull out of the hat and fry these up from something that’s been prepared without spending the 4 hours of boiling them at the event. You should really try these. These are wonderful dishes.

Very nice.

This recipe and many others are available on our SavoringthePast.net cooking blog. We also have an image reference blog of 17th and 18th century paintings and drawings called SiftingthePast.com. Make sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel so you don’t miss any upcoming episodes. And finally, our online catalog and our printed catalog that has hundreds of 18th and 19th century men’s and women’s clothing, historical cooking items, and camping items.

I want to thank you for joining us today as we savor the flavors and the aromas of the 18th century.

Parmesan Ice Cream

Parmesan Ice Cream

If you’re ever in the Fishers, Indiana area, a short drive northeast of Indianapolis, you really should visit the fine folks at Prairie Town — an 1836 frontier village located in the heart of Conner Prairie Interactive History Park. When you do, you may be lucky enough to find sweet Mrs. Curtis making her favorite dessert for her employer, Dr. Campbell. This amazing recipe finds its roots in the late 1700s. It’s called Parmesan Ice Cream — a very unusual savory ice cream that I think you’re going to love!

Ingredients:

  • 6 Eggs
  • 3 oz. grated Parmesan Reggiano Cheese
  • 1 cup of Simple Syrup
    • 2 cups sugar cooked with 1 cup water and simmered until dissolved (If you are using a modern ice cream maker you can use the sugar straight)
  • 2 cups Cream
  • Salt
  • Ice

Directions:

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The first thing you want to do is whisk your 6 eggs together. Then add in about 3 ounces of finely grated high-quality Parmesan Cheese.

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You to avoid using any of the processed cheeses available in those green cans. For the best flavor, use the real stuff. Next, add in your syrup, or straight sugar if you are using a modern ice cream maker. If you are using straight sugar, don’t worry too much about it dissolving completely because it will dissolve as we heat it up in the next step.

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To our mixture we’re going to add 2 cups of cream and stir well.

Pour the mixture into a pot and set over over medium-low heat, stirring constantly. Every so often, pull the spoon out and drag your finger across the back.

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Once your custard is ready it should leave an open spot on the spoon that doesn’t close up. Remove from heat and allow to cool for about 30 minutes.

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Once your custard has cooled, pour it into your ice cream maker. If you are using a modern ice cream maker, follow the instructions provided with your machine. We are using an 18th-century style sabotiere. Make sure not to overfill your ice cream maker. This recipe came only 1/3 of the way up the side of our sabotiere.

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Prepare your ice so that it covers above the fill line of the custard but not so high that it leaks into your ice cream. Layer in some coarse salt as you fill your bucket around the sabotiere with ice. This will drop the temperature of the ice to below freezing. Allow the sabotiere to sit for for about 7-8 minutes, before you churn your sabotiere back and forth in the ice for 10 minutes.

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After 10 minutes, carefully wipe off the top and remove the lid. Scrape down all of the iced cream forming around the inside edges of the sabotiere. Close the sabotiere back up and repeat the cycle by letting it set for 7-8 minutes before churning for another 10 minutes.Once again, scrape the sides down the inside, and repeat the process again about three more times, or until the ice cream is at your desired consistency.

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Keep in mind that the longer you let it set, the stiffer the ice cream will be, but it may also become difficult to remove from the ice cream maker.

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When eating this ice cream, you’ll notice it tastes sweet at first, followed by the salty savory flavor of cheese a little later.

Transcript of Video:

We’re here today at Connor Prairie in Fishers, Indiana. It’s a premier Living Historic site, and we’ve got a wonderful recipe for you. Thanks for joining us today on 18th Century Cooking.

[Jon] I’m here today with Mrs. Curtis and she’s promised to show me this amazing recipe for parmesan ice cream. Now, when I first heard parmesan ice cream, number one, I love ice cream and I love parmesan, but I thought, now wait a minute…

[Mrs. Curtis] The two together (Laughing softly)

[Jon] Tell me about this parmesan ice cream.

[Mrs. Curtis] I think you’ll love it. It’s a savory ice cream.

[Jon] Okay

[Mrs. Curtis] But it has a little bit of sweet and it’s very, very creamy and it’s so easy to go down your throat.

[Jon] I can’t wait to try it. Let’s get started.

[Mrs. Curtis] Alright. Well, to begin the receipt, we have to have 6 eggs.

[Jon] okay,

[Mrs. Curtis] We’ve already tested the eggs so we know that they all sank to the bottom and they’re fresh, so if you’ll begin, let’s break each one. Once these eggs are all in, then we will whisk those. To that, we’re going to add 3 ounces of grated parmesan cheese.

[Jon] If you want the best flavor with this recipe, make sure you use actual real parmesan cheese. Parmesan Reggiano, not any of the processed parmesan cheese that comes in a green can. Don’t even try it with that. You really want the real stuff.

[Mrs. Curtis] Then we’re going to add 1 cup of syrup.

[Jon] Okay

[Mrs. Curtis] The syrup is 2 cups of sugar cooked with 1 cup of water and simmered until it dissolves.

 

[Mrs. Curtis] To that we’re going to add 2 cups of cream. Stir that well.

[Jon] Okay

[Mrs. Curtis] Now that it’s well mixed I have a pot for that to go into and we’ll put it over the fire.

[Jon] This is ready to go in.

[Mrs. Curtis] It’s just a simple custard.

[Jon] So we’re going to set this over the fire. What kind of temperature are we trying to get to here?

[Mrs. Curtis] I would say a low medium as we’re stirring with a spoon. Every so often we’re going to pull the spoon out, drag your finger across the back, so once it’s ready it should leave an open spot that doesn’t close up. We’ll take it off the fire and we’ll allow it to cool for about 30 minutes.

[Jon] So tell me a bit about this parmesan cheese. Where did it come from?

[Mrs. Curtis] Well, I was thankful that the Zimmerman’s were going down to Cincinnati. This parmesan cheese was shipped in from Europe and made it all the way down to Cincinnati and that Doctor Campbell had requested that I come to make some ice cream for guests, so parmesan being a hard cheese and being very salted, it is well preserved.

[Jon] Oh yeah, long lasting, travels well.

[Mrs. Curtis] Stores very, very well. Now that our cream has cooled down, we’re ready to put it into the sabotiere.

[Jon] Okay, this is our ice cream maker, a sabotiere, and we’re not filling this up.

[Mrs. Curtis] No

[Jon] We just want it only about a third full or a quarter full, but we can put the lid on it now.

[Mrs. Curtis] Put a little salt in on top of the ice.

[Jon] So we’ve already got ice in here?

[Mrs. Curtis] Just a small layer and the salt is going to make that really cold.

[Jon] Okay.

[Mrs. Curtis] And let’s slip that in on top.

[Jon] And now we put some ice around the outside.

[Mrs. Curtis] Right.

[Mrs. Curtis] Plus I mentioned Mrs. Zimmerman has asked me to come down to do this because the Doctor has family coming in and her brother up in Nokesville has an ice house and so he doesn’t have much left but he was willing to share in order for the Doctors Family to have this.

[Jon] Just for this recipe.

[Mrs. Curtis] Yes, but we promised we’d keep him some ice cream.

[Jon] I’ll bet. He better hurry while it’s still cold.

[Jon] So we’ve got the ice all the way up almost to this bottom rim here, now I start turning it right?

[Mrs. Curtis] No.

[Jon] No? We don’t.

[Mrs. Curtis] It has to set for about seven, eight minutes because during that time, it’s really getting the canister good and cold and then once that time has passed you will get ten minutes of churning.

[Jon] I’m rotating.

[Mrs. Curtis] We’re getting close.

[Jon] Okay.

[Mrs. Curtis] What we have to do next is, we’ll wipe off the top, we’ll take off the lid, we’ll do a scrape down because all of the iced cream is forming around the edges.

[Jon] Right.

[Mrs. Curtis] Up close to the sabotiere so we’ll scrape that down so that the other cream can move in and it can continue to freeze.

[Jon] Okay.

[Mrs. Curtis] So now that we’ve scraped down the sides, you can see it’s starting to firm up.

[Jon] Oh yeah it looks good.

[Mrs. Curtis] So we’ll put the lid back on.

[Jon] okay.

[Mrs. Curtis] Not going to work it again yet.

[Jon] Okay.

[Mrs. Curtis] You’re going to let it set just a few more minutes and then you have another ten minutes to churn it.

[Mrs. Curtis] Well, it should be just about finished. It’s been about 3 cycles, 10 minutes to churn 10 minutes in between, so usually about an hour is the amount of time it takes to finish this off.

[Jon] Well, let’s see what it looks like.

[Mrs. Curtis] So let’s see, ah, yes

[Jon] The consistency looks perfect. We could probably let this set and have it stiffen up even further, but then it would be hard to get out.

[Mrs. Curtis] Yes

[Jon] Well, I can’t wait to try this.

[Mrs. Curtis] Go ahead.

[Jon] Okay. It does look good. You get a little bit of the cheese whiff off of it.

[Mrs. Curtis] I never wait long enough to smell it.

[Jon] I can believe that. Whoa, that is really, really good. You don’t get any cheese texture out of it but you get that cheese flavor.

[Mrs. Curtis] Very savory.

[Jon] And it comes in a little later, that cheese. First it’s a little sweet like ice cream and then, mmm, it warms up.

[Mrs. Curtis] The salty taste to it.

[Jon] Oh yeah. Excellent, excellent ice cream. I don’t think anybody would believe parmesan ice cream, it’s amazing. You really have to try it. Well, I want to thank you Mrs. Curtis for sharing this recipe with us. It is amazing. It is wonderful.

[Mrs. Curtis] So glad you enjoyed it. I hope the Doctor’s family enjoys it too.

[Jon] I am sure they will.

[Mrs. Curtis] (Laughs softly) Good.

[Jon] If you get a chance to come here to Connor Prairie, if you’re in this area, you really should come here. This is an amazing site. You will love it, I promise you. Thank you so much for coming along with us as we discover these amazing flavors, as we savor these flavors and the aromas of the 18th and early 19th century.

I want to give a special thanks to all the folks at Connor Prairie and make sure to check out their website. If you’re new to our channel, I want to welcome you. You can subscribe by clicking the button right up here. Also, check out our related videos. Thanks so much for watching.

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